Saturday, June 22, 2013

The North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment: Twenty Confederate Relatives From 3 Different Companies

Battle Flag of the North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment, Captured at Gettysburg


To date, I've found more relatives that served in the North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment, than any other Regiment in the Civil War.  Twenty of my ancestors once fought alongside the flag that is pictured above.  Seven of those ancestors gave their lives for the Confederacy.  My fiance's 3rd Great Grandfather also served in this Regiment, losing his life at the Battle of Seven Pines, Virginia. 

The North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment, formerly known as the North Carolina 13th State Troops, completed its organization at Garysburg, North Carolina in July of 1861.  Its men were recruited from Anson, Lincoln, Montgomery, Richmond, Granville, Catawba, and Gaston Counties.  John F. Hoke of Lincoln County was elected as Colonel,  John W. Leak of Richmond County was elected as Lieutenant Colonel and David H. Christie of Granville County was elected as Major. 




Colonel John F. Hoke


On July 17, 1861, The North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment broke camp at Garysburg, North Carolina and made way for Virginia.  The Regiment arrived on at Manassas Junction on July 21 in time for the battle, however was held in reserve.  The North Carolina 23rd made their quarters at Camp Wigfall, near the Manassas Battlefield, where they remained for several weeks.  The men of the 23rd began to suffer immensely from disease.  The immune system of the rural farm boy was no match for the new diseases they would become susceptible to in the large camps.  At one time, the sick call totaled 240 with 57 cases of typhoid fever.

The Regiment was placed in General Jubal A. Early's Brigade.  Other Regiments in Early's Brigade included the North Carolina 5th Infantry Regiment, the Georgia 20th Infantry Regiment, and the Virginia 24th and 38th Infantry Regiments. 


Brigadier General Jubal A. Early


Early's Brigade remained at Camp Wigfall until March 8, 1862, when the Unit began preparations for a move to the Peninsula.  The Brigade moved to a position south of the Rappahannock, where they remained until April 7th.  On April 7, 1862, the Brigade convened at the Railroad station near the Orange Court House.  By way of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, the Brigade was transported to Richmond, Virginia.  After arriving in Richmond, Early's Brigade marched to the Yorktown depot, where they boarded schooners for the 30 mile trip down stream.  Early's Brigade arrived in Yorktown on April 9, 1862.  Upon their arrival they reported to the earthworks previously erected for use in the Revolutionary War.

On April 17, 1862 the Brigade faced their first test of fire from the enemy.   Federal Artillery Batteries had been set up just about 3/4 of a mile from the Confederate position.  Federal sharpshooters occupying rifle pits in front of the Artillery Batteries began shooting their muskets at the Confederates.  The Confederates occupied rifle pits directly in front of their entrenchments.  Heavy rain began to pour.  The rifle pits began to fill up with rain water.  No troops from either side were able to make fires due to poor kindling and the fact that fires made for good targets.  During their spare time, many men visited the marble slab erected on the location where Cornwallis surrendered to Washington, hoping that the spot that witnessed the American Independence would also see the accomplishment of Southern Independence. 

The much smaller Confederate force at Yorktown held McClellan's vastly larger Army at bay for several weeks.  Several Confederate Regiments were transferred back to Richmond to support the Confederate Capital.  It became apparent that the only way to keep McClellan at bay any longer would be to engage the Federals.   This was not the most ideal place to wage battle against an army of superior number.  On May 4, 1862, the Confederate forces at Yorktown quietly withdrew.   On the day of the evacuation, several members of the North Carolina 23rd were on duty in the rifle pits.  As the withdrawal plan got underway, Officers in the North Carolina 23rd began to grow concerned about the safety of the men in the rifle pits.  The concern was that the men in the rifle pits may not know what to do during the withdrawal unless directly ordered.  Captain C. C. Blacknall of Company G, left the shelter of the trenches and traveled roughly 400 yards to the pits, gave the men their orders and returned unharmed.  The troops from the North Carolina 23rd were the last to evacuate Yorktown, having been relieved by the Cavalry around midnight.  At dawn, the Confederates were roughly six miles away from their former works at Yorktown when they began to hear McClellan's Federals bombarding their old position.

The Brigade found themselves roughly one mile outside the town of Williamsburg, Virginia on May 5, 1862.  Due to the fact that Williamsburg was only 12 miles from Yorktown, the Federals were in rapid pursuit of the Confederate force.  Early's Brigade, now consisting of the 5th and 23rd North Carolina, the 24th Virginia and the 2nd Florida Battalion, was ordered back to aid General James Longstreet in resisting the pursuit of the eager Federals. 

The Battle of Williamsburg was fought on nearly the same ground in which the Americans and British fought on in 1781.  Early's Brigade was tasked with making a fierce charge on Federal General Winfield Scott Hancock's Brigade on the enemy's right.  General Early rode the length of the Brigade offering words of encouragement to the young Confederate troops who were about to make their first appearance on a bonified battlefield.   The Confederate line advanced nearly 100 yards or more through a wet wheat field where they began to encounter a dense forest.  As the Confederate line became jumbled and confused due to their present location, General D. H. Hill appeared, mounted on his horse, stating sharply "hush your infernal noise". 

The right wing of Early's Brigade was the first to come into view of the enemy's Battery since they were able to march on flat land versus the dense forest.  The North Carolina 23rd's position was located in the dense forest, thus they were driven back when the Federal Batteries began their cannonade.  The North Carolina 5th made a gallant but fruitless charge toward the enemy's position.  Colonel McRea of the North Carolina 5th alleged that the 23rd was "inexcusably derelict" in not supporting their position.  He also stated that Colonel Hoke had halted his Regiment without having received orders to do so.  Colonel Hoke responded that General Early had indeed ordered him to halt, a claim never denied by Early.  A post war statement from the Commander of all Confederate forces at the time of the battle, General Joseph E. Johnston, stated that the responsibility of the charge was placed in the hands of General Daniel Harvey Hill.  Johnston also stated that he never gave the order, but rather allowed it after repeated requests from Hill.  The Federals seemed content to hold their line rather than continue their pursuit.  Following their defeat, the Confederates resumed their grand retreat towards Richmond. 



Brigadier General Samuel Garland, Jr.



On May 9, 1862, the North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment reached the Chickahominy River and made camp.  The Regiment was re-assigned to the Brigade of Brigadier General Samuel Garland, Jr..  During the day, the reorganization of the Regiment took place.  New Regimental Officers were elected as follows; Daniel H. Christie was elected Colonel, Ed. J. Christian, former Lieutenant of Company C was elected as Major,  Vines E. Turner, formerly Lieutenant of Company G was elected as Adjutant. 



Battle of Seven Pines, Currier and Ives


On May 31, 1863, the North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment participated in the Battle of Seven Pines.  Two Federal Divisions had taken up a position on the south side of the Chickahominy River.  General Joseph E. Johnston's plan was to attack the Federals.  The brunt of the attack fell on Major General Daniel Harvey Hill's Division, of which the North Carolina 23rd was a part.  Hill's Division stormed the Union camp and captured 12 pieces of Artillery. 

Conditions were anything but favorable for an attack.  Heavy rains had recently fallen and the ground was soggy and muddy.  As the Confederates made their way into a line of battle, the North Carolina 23rd found themselves in waist deep swamp water, complete with dense undergrowth.  Federal cannons supported by muskets began to fire into their ranks.  Many men of the 23rd fell dead in the water.  As the men made their way through the swamp, they began to encounter a network of abattis that further impeded their attack. 

Federal shell and shot continued to tear into the ranks of the attacking Confederates.  As gaps were torn in to the charging line, brave Confederates stepped up to close the ranks.  The Confederates closed in and moved steadily on towards the Federal position.  The Federal guns were ultimately overtaken and the two Divisions were torn apart. 

Elsewhere on the field of battle, the Confederate forces were not having nearly the same luck as Hill's Division.  Several senior Confederate Officers were wounded and/or captured, including Generals Wade Hampton, Oliver Howard, Robert Hatton, and my 2nd cousin 5x removed, James Johnston Pettigrew.  Davidson Bost was mortally wounded during the fighting.  He died from his wounds nine days later on the 9th of June.

As night put an end to the conflict, both sides regrouped and dressed their wounds.  The day's results were inconclusive.  The two armies that had faced one another were nearly even strength.  The total casualty count for the Union was 5,031 (790 killed, 3,594 wounded, 647 captured or missing).  The Confederate casualty count was 6,134 (980 killed, 4,749 wounded, 405 captured or missing.  Losses for the North Carolina 23rd included Major Edwin J. Christian who had been elected just two weeks earlier.  Captain C. C. Blacknall of Company G became Major of the Regiment. 

Following the Battle of Seven Pines, the North Carolina 23rd went into camp near Richmond, where they remained for several weeks.  The Federal line of battle now stretched nearly nine miles along the Chickahominy, its right wing resting on the northern bank just above the village of Mechanicsville. 


The fighting at Mechanicsville on June 26, 1862 opened up what would later be referred to as the "Seven Days Battles".   General Robert E. Lee's plan was to have Stonewall Jackson's force attack the right flank of the enemy, while A. P. Hill and D. H. Hill's troops were tasked with attacking the center and left.  The collective Confederate force was able to push the Federals back from their breastworks.  As night fell, a fierce Artillery duel continued.   At dawn, the Confederates renewed their attack.  After a bloody, two hour conflict, the Federals abandoned their position and fell back to a stronger line of works near Gaines' Mills. 

Daniel Harvey Hill's Division was the first to attack the Federal position at Gaines' Mills.  Once the engagement became a general one, Longstreet and Stonewall Jackson's troops became engaged.   A grand Confederate charge was ordered and line after line of Federals were pushed back even further.  The Federals fell back to Malvern Hill, a heavily fortified position overlooking a ridge.   There McClellan was able to concentrate his 300 pieces of Artillery. 

The Battle of Malvern Hill was the only battle in the Seven Days Battles that resulted in a Union victory.   This was primarily due to McClellan's favorable position.  D. H. Hill's Division made a vigorous attack on the Union right.  Due to poor communication, a Confederate attack was not carried out in a timely manner on the Union left.   The Federals were able to reinforce their right with troops from their left.  Federal gunboats on the James also prohibited the Confederates from making a thorough attack.  As night fell, both sides ceased fire.

The Confederates fully intended to renew their attack the next morning, however they found that McClellen and company had found protection amongst the Federal gunboats and steamships at Harrison's Landing.  It was at Harrison's Landing that McClellan and the Federal Army of the Potomac made their grand exit from the Peninsula, for the time being.   The North Carolina 23rd suffered roughly 30 killed and 75 wounded during the Seven Days Battles. 

Following the Battle of Malvern Hill, all was quiet on the Peninsula for a few weeks.  The next move made by the Union was to appoint General John Pope to take command of the Army of the Potomac.  Pope began planning a new assault on Richmond, making preparations to threaten from the north, rather than the Peninsula.  Stonewall Jackson's expert flank movement struck a fierce blow to Pope where he least expected it. 

The battle which would culminate at Cedar Run on August 9, 1862 resulted in a Confederate victory.  Several Federal prisoners were taken as well as several pieces of Artillery.  The overwhelming defeat of the Federals caused Lincoln and the War Department to concentrate all available Federal forces above the Rappahannock in order to reinforce Pope.

Robert E. Lee tasked D. H. Hill's Division with staying behind and monitoring the movements of McClellan while he and the rest of the Army of Northern Virginia travelled to Gordonsville, just north of Richmond.  Hill's Division rejoined the Army in late August.  The North Carolina 23rd narrowly missed another round of action at Manassas, only arriving in time to view the destruction left on the battlefield. 

Following the Second Battle of Bull Run / 2nd Manassas, Lee devised a bold plan to invade the Northern States.  Lee felt that by bringing the war to the North, Federal troops would have to leave his native state of Virginia in order to protect their homeland.  Lee's Army of Northern Virginia began their march into Maryland.   The army went in to camp at Frederick, Maryland on September 6, 1862.  On the 10th of September, the army broke camp and continued their northern march.   Following Pope's defeat at 2nd Manassas, McClellan was put back in charge of the Army of the Potomac.



Fox's Gap at the battle of South Mountain, MD. Sunday, Sept. 14, 1862


On September 14th, the Army of Northern Virginia encountered the Federal Army at South Mountain Gap.  There, D. H. Hill's Division held the main body of McClellan's army at bay long enough for Stonewall Jackson's army to take Harper's Ferry.    The North Carolina 23rd played a prominent part in the action at South Mountain.   General Garland was killed in action while defending a stone wall on the Daniel Wise Farm.  D. H. Hill memorialized him by saying  "This brilliant service, however, cost us the life of that pure, gallant, and accomplished Christian soldier, General Garland, who had no superiors and few equals in the service."

In a post war publication of the "Century Magazine" dated May of 1886, General D. H. Hill stated the following about his Divisions actions at South Mountain Gap:

“In the retirement of Lee’s army from Frederick to Hagerstown and Boonsborough, my division constituted the rear guard.  It consisted of five brigades (Wise’s brigade being left behind) and after the arrival at Boonsborough, was entrusted with guarding the wagon trains and pieces of artillery belonging to the whole army”.

“My division was very small and was embarrassed with the wagon trains and artillery of the whole army save such as Jackson had taken with him.  It must be remembered that the army  now before McClellan had been constantly marching and fighting since the 25th June.  The order excusing barefoot men from marching into Maryland sent thousands to the rear.  Divisions that had become smaller then brigades were when the fighting had begun; brigades had become smaller than regiments and regiments had become smaller than companies.”

On the morning of the 14th,General Hill had fixed his lines of battle:  “The firing had aroused General Garland and his men were under arms when he reached the pike.  I explained the situation briefly to him to sweep through the woods, reach the road and hold it at all regards, as the safety of Lee’s line of march depended upon its being held.  He went off in high spirits and I never saw him again.”


At the time, General Garland's force consisted of five Regiments of Infantry and one Artillery Battery.  The North Carolina 5th was placed on the right, the North Carolina 23rd on their left behind a stone wall.  Roughly 50 skirmishers from the North Carolina 5th encountered men from the 23rd Ohio, under then Colonel and future President, Rutherford B. Hayes.   Following the death of Garland, Colonel McRae of the North Carolina 5th assumed command of the Brigade.   Intense Federal fire began to become concentrated on the stone wall where the North Carolina 23rd was positioned.  D. H. Hill stated “The Federals had a plunging fire upon this regiment (23rd) from the crest of the hill, higher than the wall, and only about fifty yards from it.”

The 23rd Ohio began to turn their attention to the supporting Artillery Battery, however failed to capture it while the 30th Ohio came into play and began assaulting the stone wall near the North Carolina 23rd.  D. H. Hill described the result of the 30th Ohio's assault:

“Some of the 30th Ohio forced through a break in the wall and bayonets and clubbed muskets were used freely for a few minutes.  Garland’s Brigade, demoralized by his death and by the confusion, retreated behind the mountain, leaving some 200 prisoners of the 5th, 23rd and 20th N.C. in the hands of the enemy.  The brigade was too roughly handled to be of any further use that day.”

D. H. Hill described the losses of the North Carolina 23rd during the Battle of South Mountain at roughly 200 killed, wounded or missing.



North Carolina Monument at the Stone Mountain Battlefield


Just a few days later on September 17, 1862, the North Carolina 23rd participated in the bloody Battle of Antietam.   Colonel McRae of the North Carolina 5th had assumed command of Garland's Brigade.  The Divisions of Longstreet and D. H. Hill held the Confederate center and right during the Battle.  The North Carolina 23rd was battle torn from their action at South Mountain and was able to muster only a few soldiers for the fight.  In just two days of fighting at South Mountain and Antietam, the North Carolina 23rd lost roughly 45 wounded and 20 killed.  

On September 18, 1862, Robert E. Lee waited to resume the fight against the Federals, however the enemy declined to advance.  After hearing that McClellan was amassing a large number of reinforcements, Lee withdrew the Army of Northern Virginia back across the Potomac.  As the Army returned to Virginia, the various Brigades and Regiments were spread across the Virginia countryside, where they began to recruit men to replenish their ranks.   The Regiment would see light action at the Battle of Fredericksburg in December of 1862, however they did not play a prominent part.  Command of Garland's Brigade was soon passed to Brigadier General Alfred Iverson.  The Brigade was now placed in the Division of Major General Robert Rodes.


Alfred Iverson

 

The North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment played a prominent part in the Battle of Chancellorsville, which took place between April 30 - May 6, 1863.  The Regiment was on the Confederate extreme left and was conspicuous in turning the right flank of Federal General Joseph Hooker's troops.  A grand Confederate victory was won, some say Robert E. Lee's finest.  The price of victory was a large one.  Stonewall Jackson was wounded inadvertently by friendly fire on the evening of May 2nd, resulting in the amputation of his left arm.   Jackson would die from pneumonia on May 10th.



Battle of Chancellorsville by Kurz and Allison
(depicts the wounding of Confederate Lt. Gen. Stonewall Jackson on May 2, 1863)


The North Carolina 23rd also suffered greatly during the battle of Chancellorsville.  Major C. C. Blacknall was wounded and captured by the enemy.  He was confined to Old Capitol Prison in Washington D. C. before being exchanged and returned just before the Battle of Gettysburg.  General Rodes official report listed the casualties of the North Carolina 23rd as 173 killed, wounded or missing.  Stephen Spencer West, lost his life on the Chancellorsville battlefield on May 2nd.  Samuel Clark, David Goodman Crews, James A. Breedlove, Robert Hester and Henry Jadson Hester were all severely wounded at Chancellorsville.  Samuel Clark's injury resulted in the amputation of his right leg.  Both Samuel Clark and Robert Hester received the Confederate Badge of Honor for gallantry during the battle.  Robert's brother Henry Jadson Hester was also nominated for the Badge of Honor.

Following the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Army of Northern Virginia was divided into three Corps.  Iverson's Brigade remained in Rode's Division, which was now attached to Lieutenant General Richard S. Ewell's 2nd Corps.  The Unit bivouacked near Fredericksburg.   On June 3rd, Ewell's Corps, with Rodes Division in the lead, left their camp at Fredericksburg and began to march north.  The unit briefly assisted the Cavalry at Brandy Station on June 9th.  On June 12th, Ewell's Corps crossed the Blue Ridge Mountains at Chester Gap and entered the Shenandoah Valley.  The unit continued north and crossed the Potomac on June 16th.  Ewell's Corps crossed into Pennsylvania on June 22nd and bivouacked at Greencastle.  On June 27th, the Corps marched toward Carlisle, Pennsylvania, arriving there on the evening of the 27th.

On July 1, 1863, Ewell's Corps moved toward Gettysburg.  While en route, word came that A.P. Hill's Corps was moving on Gettysburg.  General Ewell ordered Rodes' Division to proceed there also to assist Hill.  When Rodes' Division arrived on the field, they found Hill's Corps already engaged with the Federals.  Rodes moved his Division in position on Hill's left.  Iverson's Brigade was on the right center of Rodes line.  Major General Jubal A. Early's Division arrived on the field and was placed to the left of Rodes'.  The Combined assault drove the enemy through the town of Gettysburg.



Iverson's Brigade Marker at Gettysburg


Below is General Iverson's post battle report that followed the Battle of Gettysburg:


CAMP NEAR DARKESVILLE, W. VA.,
July 17, 1863.
Maj. H. A. WHITING,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

        SIR: I have the honor to report that, upon arriving in the vicinity of Gettysburg, Pa., where a fight was progressing between the corps of Lieut. Gen. A. P. Hill and the enemy, on the morning of July 1, my brigade, being in the advance of Maj. Gen. R. E. Rodes' division, was ordered by him to form line of battle and advance toward the firing at Gettysburg. This advance brought my brigade across a wooded height overlooking the plain and the town of Gettysburg.
        General Rodes here took upon himself the direction of the brigade, and moved it by the right flank, changing at the same time the direction of the line of battle. Masses of the enemy being observed on the plain in front, General Rodes ordered a halt until artillery could be brought to play upon them. During the cannonading that ensued, my brigade was in support of the battery, and, having received instructions from General Rodes to advance gradually to the support of a battery he intended placing in front, and not understanding the exact time at which the advance was to take place, I dispatched a staff officer to him, to learn at what time I was to move forward, and received instructions not to move until my skirmishers became hotly engaged.
        Shortly afterward, however, I received an order from him to advance to meet the enemy, who were approaching to take the battery; to call upon Brigadier-General Daniel for support; that Colonel O'Neal's (Alabama) brigade would advance on my left, and the batteries would cease firing as I passed them. I immediately dispatched a staff officer to inform Brigadier-General Daniel that I was about to advance, and one to notify my regiments, and to observe when the brigade on my left commenced to move.
        Learning that the Alabama brigade, on my left, was moving, I advanced at once, and soon came in contact with the enemy, strongly posted in woods and behind a concealed stone wall. My brigade advanced to within 100 yards, and a most desperate fight took place. I observed a gap on my left, but presumed that it would soon be filled by the advancing Alabama brigade, under Colonel O'Neal. Briga-dier-General Daniel came up to my position, and I asked him for immediate support, as I was attacking a strong position. He promised to send me a large regiment, which I informed him would be enough, as the Third Alabama Regiment was then moving down on my right, and I then supposed was sent to my support. At the same time, I pointed out to General Daniel a large force of the enemy who were about to outflank my right, and asked him to take care of them. He moved past my position, and engaged the enemy some distance to my right, but the regiment he had promised me, and which I had asked him to forward to the position at which I stood, and where I was being pressed most heavily, did not report to me at all.
        I again sent Capt. D. P. Halsey, assistant adjutant-general, to ask General Daniel for aid, who informs me that he met his staff officer, and was told that one regiment had been sent, and no more could be spared. I then found that this regiment had formed on the right of the Third Alabama, which was on my right, and could not be used in time to save my brigade, for Colonel O'Neal's (Alabama) brigade had in the meantime advanced on my left, and been almost instantaneously driven back, upon which the enemy, being relieved from pressure, charged in overwhelming force upon and captured nearly all that were left unhurt in three regiments of my brigade.
        When I saw white handkerchiefs raised, and my line of battle still lying down in position, I characterized the surrender as disgraceful; but when I found afterward that 500 of my men were left lying dead and wounded on a line as straight as a dress parade, I exonerated, with one or two disgraceful individual exceptions, the survivors, and claim for the brigade that they nobly fought and died without a man running to the rear. No greater gallantry and heroism has been displayed during this war.
        I endeavored, during the confusion among the enemy incident to the charge and capture of my men, to make a charge with my remaining regiment and the Third Alabama, but in the noise and excitement I presume my voice could not be heard.
        The fighting here ceased on my part, the Twelfth North Carolina still retaining its position until, Brigadier-General Ramseur coming up, I pointed out the position of the enemy to him, and as soon as I observed his troops about to flank the enemy, I advanced the Twelfth North Carolina and fragments of the other regiments (which Capt. D. P. Halsey had already prepared for a forward movement) into the woods overlooking the town, and took possession of them.
        Going out to the front to stop General Ramseur's men from firing into mine, who were in their front, I observed that the enemy were retreating along the railroad, and immediately hastened the Twelfth North Carolina forward to cut them off. The Fifty-third North Carolina Regiment, of General Daniel's brigade, joined in the pursuit, and the Twelfth and Fifty-third North Carolina were the first to reach the railroad along which the enemy were retreating. Numberless prisoners were cut off by us, but I would not permit my men to take them to the rear, as I considered them safe.
        Arriving in the town, and having but very few troops left, I informed General Ramseur that I would attach them to his brigade, and act in concert with him, and we formed on the street facing the heights beyond Gettysburg occupied by the enemy, where we remained till the night of July 2, when I was informed by General Ramseur that a night attack was ordered upon the position of the enemy to the right of the town. I had received no instructions, and perceiving that General Ramseur was acquainted with the intentions of the major-general commanding the division, I raised no question of rank, but conformed the movements of my brigade to that of Brigadier-General Ramseur, advanced with him, got under the fire of the enemy's skirmishers and artillery without returning the fire, and perceiving, as I believe every one did, that we were advancing to certain destruction, when other parts of the line fell back, I also gave the order to retreat, and formed in the road, in which we maintained a position during that night and the whole of July 3, while the fight of that day was progressing, and from which we fell back about 3 a.m. of July 4 to the ridge near the theological seminary.
        From this position, I was moved about 2 p.m. same day, to escort the wagon train on the Fairfield road. I enclose herewith a list of casualties.
        To the officers and men of the brigade great credit is due for the great bravery with which they sustained the position to which they were ordered to advance.
        Capt. D. P. Halsey, assistant adjutant-general, was very conspicuous throughout the day for his distinguished gallantry and energy.
        Lieut. Col. H. E. Coleman, volunteer aide, and Lieut. J. T. Ector, aide-de-camp, were also especially zealous and brave in the discharge of the duties I called upon them to perform.
        Much credit is due the brave Capt. Benjamin Robinson, Fifth North Carolina, for the manner in which he handled his corps of sharpshooters.
        I cannot fail to commend the officers and men of the Twelfth North Carolina for the steady retention of their position, and for their bold advance without supports into the woods occupied by the enemy.


I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,
ALFRED IVERSON,
Brigadier-General. 



CAMP NEAR DARKESVILLE, W. VA.,
July 17, 1863.

Maj. H. A. WHITING,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
        MAJOR: I have the honor to report that on July 4 my brigade was moved, by order received from Colonel [Abner] Smead, corps inspector, from Gettysburg, to escort a wagon train in the direction of Hagerstown, on the Fairfield road. The train having started some time in advance of me, I did not overtake it till midnight, at which time I learned that it had been cut in two by the enemy at the turnpike. I hastened forward all my troops in the most fatiguing march I ever witnessed, reached the turnpike about dawn, captured a few of the enemy, got the remnant of the train out on the turnpike, and, when Lieut. Gen. A. P. Hill's corps came up, moved down the mountain and went into camp.
        Reached Hagerstown next day 6th, where I found the enemy engaged with our cavalry. Sent the train back to the rear, deployed skirmishers, fixed an ambuscade, and I believe killed, wounded, and captured as many of the enemy as I had men. My loss was 3 killed and 6 wounded. Drove the enemy through Hagerstown, and marched to within 2 miles of Williamsport that night, in support of Major-General Stuart's cavalry, which had come up during the fight.
        Next day 7th, entered Williamsport, and turned over the train. Seeing great confusion, I assumed the duties of provost-marshal, and used my brigade for several days as guards, &c., when my connection with the brigade ceased.


I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
ALFRED IVERSON,
Brigadier-General.


The North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment lost 55% killed and wounded on the first day of fighting at Gettysburg.  The loss of the Regiment as so great that it could not be taken into battle on the second day.  The Regiment was left without a commissioned officer, all having been among the killed and wounded.  Colonel D. H. Christie was mortally wounded.  Fleming West was captured and taken prisoner.  Major Blacknall was disabled by a bullet that entered his mouth, knocked out several teeth and exited through the back of his neck.  He was captured on the retreat to Virginia after having to rest at a farm house.  Colonel Christie was captured in an ambush but was recovered by Confederate Cavalry and taken to Williamsport,  unfortunately dying from his wounds on the way.  Blacknell initially escaped his captors but was taken again the next morning to Fort McHenry where he and other officers were forced to draw lots for the fate of being shot in retaliation of a Federal Major being shot in Richmond earlier.  Major Blacknell drew the unlucky number and was condemned to death but for some reason was spared.  He was transferred to Johnson's Island Prison Camp in Ohio before being returned home in March of 1864.  Against the will of his friends and family and although being a shadow of his former self by reasons of his wounds and imprisonment, Blacknell rejoined his Regiment in time to participate in Early's great march to Washington.   He eventually received his death wound at the Battle of Winchester on September 19, 1864.  Blacknall's foot was shattered by the bullet from a Federal Cavalryman's carbine.  Amputation failed to failed to hinder the gangrene that had set in.  Blacknell died from his wounds on October 4, 1864.



Brigadier General Robert Daniel Johnston



Following the Battle of Gettysburg, the Brigade, which was left with nearly no field officers, refused to serve any longer under the command of Iverson.  Colonel Robert Daniel Johnston was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General and placed in command of Iverson's former Brigade.   Johnston's Brigade spent the Fall/Winter of 1863-64 in camp at Hanover, Virginia, where they recuperated from their wounds.  The Brigade was also able to replenish it's ranks from recruitment and conscription.  As the men entered the Campaigns of 1864, they appeared to be well equipped and in good fighting shape.  After a season of recruitment near Hanover, the Brigade was ordered to rejoin the Army of Northern Virginia near the vicinity of the Wilderness of Spotsylvania.



Battle of the Wilderness by Kurz and Allison.


The Battle of the Wilderness was fought between May 5 - 7, 1864.  It was the first battle in Federal General Ulysses Grant's "Overland Campaign" against Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.  Johnston's Brigade took part in the engagement with John B. Gordon's Brigade, which turned the right flank of the Federal line.  During the flanking attack, the Confederates penetrated the rear of the Federal line with 200 - 300 men.  Bloody hand to hand combat ensued.  The Confederates were recalled and narrowly escaped from the same line they initially penetrated.

During the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, the Brigade was held in reserve to contend with any point of attack along the Confederate right.  A Federal assault drove two Confederate Brigades from their works.  Johnston's Brigade re-carried the position and re-established the line.  After the re-capture of the breast works, the Brigade was withdrawn and re-occupied it's position in reserve until the line held by Major General Edward Johnson was carried by the enemy.  Johnston's Brigade was ordered to re-take those works.  The Federals had eagerly overtaken the former Confederate position, now occupying it with three lines of battle. 

Johnston's Brigade made a gallant charge and was immediately confronted with the three lines of battle, only 50 yards apart from one another.  The Federals occupying the lines of battle numbered no less than 5,000.  As the Confederates approached the 1st line of battle, a Federal Officer from a New York Regiment dashed out and demanded the surrender of the Brigade.  He was immediately shot down.  Another Federal Officer ran up with the same command and shared the same fate.

Instead of surrendering, an Officer from the North Carolina 23rd grabbed the colors of the Regiment and ordered a charge.  As the Confederates charged, the Federals were driven from their position.  The Confederate line of battle was re-established.  General Johnston was making strategic observations from the angle of the Confederate breastworks when he was shot in the head.  Johnston survived his wounds and rejoined the Brigade in August of 1864 to participate in General Early's Shenandoah Valley Campaign.



The Battle of Cedar Creek


The Regiment would next see action as part of General Early's command in his great march on Washington D. C.  The Brigade participated in all the battles of that command and participated in the flank movement with Gordon's Division at Bell Grove and Cedar Creek.   During the Battle of Cedar Creek, the Brigade faced brutal hand to hand combat with the Federal Army's VI Corps.  Along with Battle's Alabama Brigade, the Confederates were able to capture six pieces of Federal Artillery. 

The Brigade was then ordered to the front of Middlesburg, where it began skirmishing with Federal Cavalry.  Federal General Philip H. Sheirdan was now in command of all United States Cavalry.  That evening, Sheridan made his attack on the left flank of the Confederate line.  The line held by Gordon's Brigade began to break, following with the line held by Ramseur's Brigade.  Johnston's Brigade was the only Confederate force that remained organized, retiring with it's line unbroken, halting and firing repeatedly as they were being pressed on by Federal troops.

After falling back near Cedar Creek, General Pegram sent an order to Johnston to "cross the bridge" and follow the road to Strasburg.  Johnston replied that it would be impossible to cross the bridge due to the enemy's breastworks that were currently occupied by Federal troops.   Johnston explained that he could cross the river at another point and keep his command intact.  Another message was sent commanding Johnston to cross the bridge.  Johnston complied with the order.  As the Confederates were crossing the bridge, the Federals began to pour volleys of musket fire into them.  Having been completely at the mercy of the Federal troops, the Brigade fell into confusion and retreated under the cover of the darkness.

Sheridan's Cavalry continued to press the retreating Confederates along their retreat into the Shenandoah Valley.  As the Confederate columns reached Mount Jackson, General Johnston was ordered to face about and hold the enemy in check.  Johnston formed a line of battle and began to throw out skirmishers.  The resulting fire fight was one of the most intense fights that the Brigade had participated in.  The Federals were defeated and pushed back.

The North Carolina 23rd continued to participate in Early's Valley Campaign until they were transferred to assist Lee's forces near Richmond and Petersburg.   Sheridan had been ordered to reinforce Grant's rear near Petersburg.  There they participated in the defense of the Confederate stronghold until April of 1865.  The Confederate line finally broke in early April.  The Army of Northern Virginia began to withdraw towards Appomattox on April 3rd.  Johnston's Brigade performed rear guard duty on the retreat.  The men made a stand on April 6th at Saylor's Creek and repulsed an assault on their front.  On April 7-8, 1865 the Army continued towards Appomattox, arriving there on April 9th where they were surrendered with Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.  Eighty six men from the North Carolina 23rd were paroled on April 12, 1865 in accordance with Lee's surrender.


Sixteen of my family members served in the North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment along with my fiance's 3rd Great Grandfather.  Below are brief biographies of these men.


Company E known as the "Granville Targetteers" was raised in Oxford, Granville County, North Carolina on June 5, 1861.

 
Samuel Clark



Samuel Clark was born in Stem, Granville County, North Carolina on September 11, 1832.  He is the husband of my 2nd Great Grand Aunt, Louisa Jane Wheeler.  Samuel was conscripted as a Private in Company E, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment in Wake County on July 8, 1862 at the age of 29.



1st Muster Roll for Samuel


He was listed as present and accounted until he was captured at South Mountain, Maryland on September 14-17, 1862.


Muster Roll showing Samuel was captured at South Mountain


Samuel was confined to Fort McHenry, Maryland and Fortress Monroe, Virginia until he was transferred to Aiken's Landing on the James River where he was received on October 19, 1862. Samuel remained at Aiken's Landing until he was exchanged on November 10, 1862. 



POW Roll showing Samuel's exchange


He returned to duty in March of 1863.  Samuel was wounded in the right thigh and captured during the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia on May 3, 1863.  His injury resulted in the amputation of his right leg. 



Muster Roll showing Samuel was wounded at Chancellorsville resulting in leg amputation


His prosthetic leg is currently on display at the North Carolina Museum of History.



Samuel Clark's Prosthetic Leg and Crutch
  

Samuel was retired to the Invalid Corps on April 23, 1864.  



Register showing Samuel was retired to the Invalid Corps


Samuel received the Badge of Honor for gallantry at Chancellorsville, the Confederate equivalent of the Medal of Honor.




Roll of Honor for Samuel showing he received the Badge of Honor


He returned home to Granville County where he lived an additional 28 years following the end of the Civil War.  Samuel Clark died in Dutchville, Granville County, North Carolina on November 27, 1893 at the age of 61.  He is buried in the Clark Family Cemetery in Granville County, North Carolina.



Grave of Samuel Clark


Here's my relation to Samuel Clark:

Samuel Clark (1832 - 1893)
husband of 2nd great grand aunt
Louisa Jane Wheeler (1836 - 1898)
wife of Samuel Clark
Benjamin Franklin Wheeler (1803 - 1883)
father of Louisa Jane Wheeler
Christopher Columbus Wheeler (1842 - 1912)
son of Benjamin Franklin Wheeler
Benjamin Elliott Wheeler (1883 - 1951)
son of Christopher Columbus Wheeler
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Benjamin Elliott Wheeler
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



David Goodman Crews was born in Granville County, North Carolina on May 13, 1839.  He is my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  Prior to the Civil War, David was a farmer by trade.  He enlisted as a Private in Company E, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment in Granville County, North Carolina on June 5, 1861 at the age of 22.


1st Muster Roll for David


David was present and accounted for until he was wounded in the hand at Gaines' Mill, Virginia on June 27, 1862.  He returned to duty prior to January 1, 1863.



Muster Roll showing David was wounded at Chancellorsville


He was present and accounted for until he was wounded during the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 3, 1863.  David returned to duty in November of 1863 and was promoted to Sergeant on November 1, 1863.




Muster Roll showing David's promotion to Sergeant


He was promoted to Brevet 2nd Lieutenant on September 26, 1864. 



Muster Roll showing David's promotion to Brevet 2nd Lieutenant


David was present and accounted for until he was again wounded, this time during the Battle of Cedar Creek, Virginia on October 19, 1864. 



Muster Roll showing David was wounded at Cedar Creek


He returned to duty in November of 1864.  David was present and accounted for until he was paroled at Appomattox Court House, Virginia on April 9, 1865.



Parole for David


Following the war, David returned home to Granville County, North Carolina, where he lived an additional 56 years.  David Goodman Crews died in Granville County, North Carolina on November 30, 1921 at the age of 82.  He is buried in Elmwood Cemetery in Oxford, Granville County, North Carolina.



Grave of David Goodman Crews


Here's my relation to David:

David Goodman Crews (1839 - 1921)
is your 2nd cousin 5x removed
James A Crews (1813 - 1892)
father of David Goodman Crews
James Crews (1785 - 1875)
father of James A Crews
Gideon Crews (1730 - 1815)
father of James Crews
Abigail Crews (1775 - 1822)
daughter of Gideon Crews
L. Chesley Daniel (1806 - 1882)
son of Abigail Crews
William Henry "Buck" Daniel (1827 - 1896)
son of L. Chesley Daniel
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of William Henry "Buck" Daniel
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Rufus T. Moss was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1842.  He is my 1st cousin 4x removed.  Rufus was a student prior to his enlistment in the Confederate Army.  He enlisted as a Private in Company E, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment on June 5, 1861 at the age of 19.



1st Muster Roll for Rufus


Rufus was present and accounted for until he died from "pneumonia after measles" at Camp Ellis, Virginia on September 14, 1861 at the age of  19.  His burial location is not known at this time.



Report showing Rufus' death


Here's my relation to Rufus:

Rufus T. Moss (1842 - 1861)
is your 1st cousin 4x removed
Richard Sell A. Moss (1815 - 1861)
father of Rufus T. Moss
Benjamin Lucious Moss (1792 - 1847)
father of Richard Sell A. Moss
James C. Moss (1824 - 1891)
son of Benjamin Lucious Moss
William Allen Moss (1859 - 1931)
son of James C. Moss
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of William Allen Moss
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Benjamin Franklin Wheeler was born in Dutchville, Granville County on June 1, 1840.  He is my 2nd Great Grand Uncle.  Prior to the war, Benjamin was a farmer by trade.  Benjamin enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment in Granville County, North Carolina on June 5, 1861 at the age of 21.



1st Muster for Benjamin


Benjamin was present and accounted for until he was sent to the General Hospital in Richmond, Virginia on Surgeon's Certificate on October 15, 1861. 



Muster Roll showing Benjamin was sent to the Hospital



Benjamin Franklin Wheeler died "at home" from disease on November 24, 1861 at the age of 21.



Muster Roll showing Benjamin's Death



He is buried in the C. C. Wheeler Family Cemetery located on land his family had owned since the mid 1700's in Granville County.



Grave of Benjamin Franklin Wheeler


Here's my relation to Benjamin:

Benjamin Franklin Wheeler (1840 - 1861)
is your 2nd great grand uncle
Benjamin Franklin Wheeler (1803 - 1883)
father of Benjamin Franklin Wheeler
Christopher Columbus Wheeler (1842 - 1912)
son of Benjamin Franklin Wheeler
Benjamin Elliott Wheeler (1883 - 1951)
son of Christopher Columbus Wheeler
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Benjamin Elliott Wheeler
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce 



Company F, known as the "Catawba Guards" was raised in Newton, Catawba County, North Carolina  on June 6, 1861.



William Robert Davidson Bost

William Robert "Davidson" Bost was born in Catawba County on November 21, 1823.  He is my fiance's 3rd Great Grandfather.  Davidson was a Blacksmith prior to the Civil War.  He enlisted as a Private in Company F, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment in Catawba County on June 6, 1861 at the age of 38. 


1st Muster Roll for Davidson


From June through November of 1861, Davidson was detailed as a Blacksmith near Union Mills, North Carolina.   He returned to the Regiment on December 1, 1861.



Company Return for Davidson


Davidson was wounded at the Battle of Seven Pines on May 31, 1862.  He died from his wounds on June 9, 1862.  His family was paid the $122.05 that was due to him for his service. 



Roll of Honor for Davidson


Davidson was 38 years old at the time of his death.  His body was returned to Catawba County.  He is buried in the Old St. Paul's Lutheran Church Cemetery in Newton, Catawba County. 




Grave of William Robert Davidson Bost


Here is my fiance's relation to Davidson:

William Robert Davidson Bost (1823 - 1862)
is her 3rd great grandfather
Phillip Elcanah Bost (1854 - 1894)
son of William Robert Davidson Bost
James Wellington Bost (1879 - 1965)
son of Phillip Elcanah Bost
Nancy Carolyn Bost (1934 - )
daughter of James Wellington Bost
Elizabeth Myers (1960 - )
daughter of Nancy Carolyn Bost
Melanie Green
she is the daughter of Elizabeth



Company G, known as the "Granville Rifles" was raised in Granville County, North Carolina on June 11, 1861. 


James A. Breedlove


James A. Breedlove was born in Granville County, North Carolina on April 4, 1834.  He is my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  James enlisted as a Sergeant in Company G, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment in Henderson County on June 1, 1861 at the age of 27. 



1st Muster for James


James was elected 2nd Lieutenant on August 15, 1862 to replace 2nd Lieutenant W. F. Gill who was killed on July 1, 1862.  


Muster Roll showing James was elected 2nd Lieutenant


James quickly rose up the Confederate ranks.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on November 3, 1862.




Regimental Return showing James election as 1st Lieutenant


James was promoted a third time, this time to the rank of Captain on February 6, 1863. 



Roster showing James promotion to Captain


He was severely wounded at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 3, 1863.



List showing James was wounded at Chancellorsville


James was captured in the trenches of Petersburg, Virginia on March 26, 1865.  He was originally confined to Old Capitol Prison, Washington, D.C., on March 27, 1865 before being sent to Fort Delaware on March 30th.



POW roll showing James was confined at Old Capitol Prison before being sent to Fort Delaware


He was released from Fort Delaware, Maryland on June 17, 1865 after taking the Oath of Allegiance to the United States.   The description on his oath lists him as having a ruddy complexion and light hair.  It also states he was six feet tall with blue eyes.




Oath of Allegiance for James


James returned to Granville County, North Carolina after the end of the Civil War where he lived for an additional 3 years.  James A. Breedlove died in Granville County, North Carolina on May 8, 1868 at the age of 34.   He is buried in the Salem United Methodist Church near Oxford, North Carolina.



Grave of James A. Breedlove


James' brother John Henry Breedlove also served in Company G, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment.



John Henry Breedlove


John Henry Breedlove was born in Granville County, North Carolina on October 2, 1840.  He is also my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  John was the younger brother of Captain James A. Breedlove.  Their youngest brother, Benjamin Isaac Breedlove, served as a Private in Company B, North Carolina 70th Infantry Regiment/1st Junior Reserves.   John enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment on July 8, 1862 at the age of 21. 



1st Muster Roll for John


John was detailed as a teamster on General Ramseur's Division Wagon Train in October of 1862.  According to Confederate Military records, James held this position through the end of the war.



Muster Roll showing John was detailed as a teamster


Following the end of the Civil War, John returned home to Granville County, North Carolina where he lived an additional 45 years. 



John Henry Breedlove and Family, circa 1894


John Henry Breedlove died in Granville County, North Carolina on May 31, 1910 at the age of 69.  He is buried in the Salem United Methodist Church near Oxford, North Carolina. 



Grave of John Henry Breedlove


Due to the fact that James and John were brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart.

Here's my relation to John:

John Henry Breedlove (1840 - 1910)
is your 2nd cousin 5x removed
Martha Patsy Crews (1806 - 1876)
mother of John Henry Breedlove
Gideon Crews Jr. (1779 - 1859)
father of Martha Patsy Crews
Gideon Crews (1730 - 1815)
father of Gideon Crews Jr.
Abigail Crews (1775 - 1822)
daughter of Gideon Crews
L. Chesley Daniel (1806 - 1882)
son of Abigail Crews
William Henry "Buck" Daniel (1827 - 1896)
son of L. Chesley Daniel
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of William Henry "Buck" Daniel
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Emmett Gooch was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1821.   He is my 2nd cousin, 4x removed.  Emmett enlisted in Company G, North Carolina 23rd Infantry on February 20, 1862 at the age of 41.



1st Muster Roll for Emmett


Emmett's tenure in the North Carolina 23rd wasn't very long.  He was discharged by reason of disability on July 22, 1862.


Muster Roll showing Emmett was discharged


The Surgeon's Certificate states due to disability, Emmett was unfit for duty.


Surgeon's Certificate discharging Emmett from the Confederate Army

Following his discharge, Emmett returned home to Granville County, North Carolina, where he lived for at least an additional 35 years.  The last record that can be found for Emmett is the 1900 Federal Census where he and his wife, Fanny are shown living in Dutchville, Granville County, North Carolina with their daughter, Rebecca and her husband.   His date of death and burial location are not known at this time.

Here's my relation to Emmett:

Emmett Gooch (1821 - 1900)
is your 2nd cousin 4x removed
Elizabeth F. "Betsy" Wheeler (1798 - 1870)
mother of Emmett Gooch
Martin Wheeler (1775 - 1822)
father of Elizabeth F. "Betsy" Wheeler
William Wheeler (1725 - 1780)
father of Martin Wheeler
Benjamin Wheeler (1755 - 1830)
son of William Wheeler
Benjamin Franklin Wheeler (1803 - 1883)
son of Benjamin Wheeler
Christopher Columbus Wheeler (1842 - 1912)
son of Benjamin Franklin Wheeler
Benjamin Elliott Wheeler (1883 - 1951)
son of Christopher Columbus Wheeler
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Benjamin Elliott Wheeler
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


Hilliard Grisham was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1830.  He is my 1st cousin, 7x removed.  Hilliard enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment on February 20, 1862 at the age of 22.


1st Muster for Hilliard


On April 20, 1862, Hilliard was sent to the hospital in Richmond, Virginia for an undisclosed reason.  He returned to his Company in October of 1862, but was sent back to the hospital in November by recommendation of the surgeon.


Muster Roll showing Hilliard was sent to the Hospital


On January 1, 1863, Hilliard died from the disease that had plagued him.  He was 23 years old at the time of his death.  His burial location is not known at this time.


Muster Roll showing Hilliard's death

Here's my relation to Hilliard:

Hilliard Grisham (1830 - 1863)
is your 1st cousin 7x removed
Lucy Hester (1784 - 1850)
mother of Hilliard Grisham
William Stephen Hester (1716 - 1774)
father of Lucy Hester
Mary Hester (1760 - 1818)
daughter of William Stephen Hester
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
son of Mary Hester
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
son of James Currin III
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Abner Currin
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce 


Samuel Wesley Reavis

Samuel Wesley Reavis was born in Granville County, North Carolina on July 18, 1843.  He is my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  Prior to the war, Samuel and his brother Thomas Coghill (T.C) Reavis were both farmers by trade.   The Reavis brothers lived on a farm that had been in their family for several generations.
Samuel enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment on June 11, 1861 at the age of 17.  He fibbed about his age in order to enlist, reasoning that he would soon be the appropriate 18 years of age.


1st Muster for Samuel

Saumel's real age was found out by the March and April of 1862 Muster Roll.  The remarks note that he was under 18 years of age and not entitled to a bounty.


Muster Roll showing Samuel was under 18 years of age when he enlisted

Samuel was listed as being present and accounted for through February of 1864 when he was allowed to go home on furlough for 18 days beginning on February 25, 1864.


Muster Roll showing Samuel's furlough

On September 19, 1864, Samuel was captured by Federal forces while he was on picket duty near Winchester, Virginia.


Muster Roll showing Samuel was captured by the enemy

On September 20, 1864, Samuel was sent to Harper's Ferry, West Virginia.  He was then transferred to the Federal Prison Camp at Point Lookout, Maryland on September 23, 1864.


POW Roll for Samuel

On March 25, 1865, Samuel was transferred to Aiken's Landing, Virginia for exchange.


POW Roll showing Samuel's exchange

Following his exchange, Samuel returned to his Company.  When the war ended, he returned home to Granville County, North Carolina where he lived an additional 58 years.  By the time of his death, the part of Granville County, that he lived in had become Vance County.  Samuel Wesley Reavis died in Vance County, North Carolina on October 19, 1923 at the age of 80.  He is buried in the Wiggins-Basket Cemetery in Henderson, Vance County.


Grave of Samuel Wesley Reavis


The Reavis brothers were raised in the Old Reavis House, which was built around 1789/90


Thomas Coghill Reavis was born in Granville County, North Carolina on March 11, 1838.  He is also my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  Thomas or T.C. as he would later be referred to, was the older brother of Samuel Wesley Reavis.


Thomas Coghill "T.C." Reavis


Although T.C. was older than Samuel, he was conscripted nearly a year after his brother's enlistment.  T.C. was conscripted into the Confederate Army on July 2, 1862.  He was 24 years old when he entered Company G, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment.


1st Muster Roll for T.C.


T. C. was wounded in the Battle of Sharpsburg or Antietam on September 17, 1862.  His brother, Samuel helped him to safety.  His injury would plague him for the remainder of the Civil War. 


Register showing T.C. had been wounded at Sharpsburg

T.C. spent the remainder of 1862 and a good part of 1863 in a Confederate Hospital in Richmond recovering from his wounds.  He was sent home on furlough to further recover from his wounds.   Perhaps it was being at home with his family, or the carnage that he had seen on the battlefield or both, but for whatever reason T.C. decided to stay at home a little longer than his furlough allowed.


Muster Roll showing T.C. was absent without leave

T.C. was "absent without leave from April 20, 1863 to June of 1863.  He returned to his Regiment on June 25, 1863.


Register showing T.C. had returned to duty

As stated before, the wounds that T.C. received at the Battle of Sharpsburg would plague him for the remainder of the war.  He was never deemed "unfit for duty", however was never of full use to his Regiment. 
On February 3, 1864, by order of the Confederate Secretary of War, T.C. was detailed for Provost Guard duty at Camp Holmes in Raleigh, North Carolina. He would remain in this position until the end of the war.


Muster Roll showing T.C. was detailed for Provost Guard duty in Raleigh

Following the end of the Civil War, T.C. returned home to Granville County, North Carolina.  By 1880, he and his family had relocated to Warren County, North Carolina, where he would live until his death in 1926.  Thomas Coghill Reavis died in Warren County, North Carolina on April 1, 1926 at the age of 88.  He is buried in the Thomas Coghill Reavis Cemetery in Warren County.


T.C. Reavis House in Warren County


Due to the fact that Samuel and T.C. were brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart.

Here's my relation to Thomas Coghill:

Thomas Coghill Reavis (1838 - 1926)
is your 2nd cousin 5x removed
Lewis Pleasant Reavis (1804 - 1880)
father of Thomas Coghill Reavis
Martha Patsey Green Harris (1784 - 1850)
mother of Lewis Pleasant Reavis
Capt. Isham Harris (1741 - 1824)
father of Martha Patsey Green Harris
Ransom Harris Sr. (1764 - 1832)
son of Capt. Isham Harris
Ann Washington Harris (1795 - 1870)
daughter of Ransom Harris Sr.
James C. Moss (1824 - 1891)
son of Ann Washington Harris
William Allen Moss (1859 - 1931)
son of James C. Moss
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of William Allen Moss
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


A wonderful book has recently been written by a direct descendant of the Reavis family who actually grew up in the Old Reavis House.  Upon These Steps: Brothers in the NC 23rd Regiment by David C. Reavis.  Published by CreateSpace Independent Publishing on December 7, 2012.  I purchased this book from the Granville County History Museum, not knowing that I was related to the books main characters.  By the time I got to the 5th or 6th page, I noticed a name that looked familiar, Martha Patsey Harris.  Martha was the grandmother of the Reavis brothers.  She also happens to be my 5th Great Grand Aunt.   I Highly recommend this book.  Reavis does a great job with his testament to these brave men.  Below is a link to the author's page that gives details on how to purchase.  The book is also available from most major booksellers.

http://www.uponthesesteps.com/







Company I, known as the "Granville Stars" was raised at Oak Hill, Granville County, North Carolina on June 17, 1861.



Stephen H. Beasley


Stephen H. Beasley was born in Granville County, North Carolina in June of 1834.  He is my 2nd cousin 6x removed.  Stephen enlisted as a Private in Company I, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment on June 17, 1861 at the age of 27.

He was promoted to the rank of Corporal on June 18, 1862.  Stephen surrendered with the Regiment on April 9, 1865 at Appomattox Court House, Virginia.   Following the end of the war, Stephen settled in Lenoir County, North Carolina where he lived an additional 45 years.  Stephen H. Beasley died in Lenior County, North Carolina sometime in 1910 at the age of  76.  His burial location is not known at this time.

Here's my relation to Stephen:

Stephen H. Beasley (1834 - 1910)
is your 2nd cousin 6x removed
Fleming Beasley (1799 - 1861)
father of Stephen H. Beasley
Sarah Sally Pomfret (1763 - 1848)
mother of Fleming Beasley
John Pomfret (1720 - 1814)
father of Sarah Sally Pomfret
Frances Hunt Pomfret (1747 - 1826)
daughter of John Pomfret
Pomfret Blackwell (1769 - 1828)
son of Frances Hunt Pomfret
Phoebe Blackwell (1812 - 1860)
daughter of Pomfret Blackwell
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Phoebe Blackwell
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce  




William Currin


William Currin was born in Granville County, North Carolina on August 2, 1827.  He is my 1st cousin 5x removed.  William enlisted as a Private in Company I, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment on March 1, 1862 at the age of 37.  William's 1st cousin, Wyatt Currin, also served in Company I.  Confederate records confuse the two of them, thus William's records were overlooked and filed as Wyatt's.



Reference Slip showing that William was mistaken for Wyatt


William died in Richmond, Virginia from wounds sustained in battle on June 6, 1862 at the age of 35.  His body was returned to Granville County, North Carolina where it was buried in the Hester Baptist Church Cemetery in Oxford, North Carolina. 



Grave of William Currin


Here's my relation to William:

William Currin (1827 - 1862)
is your 1st cousin 5x removed
Sarah "Sally" Blackwell (1801 - 1876)
mother of William Currin
Pomfret Blackwell (1769 - 1828)
father of Sarah "Sally" Blackwell
Phoebe Blackwell (1812 - 1860)
daughter of Pomfret Blackwell
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Phoebe Blackwell
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Wyatt Currin was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1829.   He is my 1st cousin 6x removed.  Wyatt enlisted as a Private in Company I, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment at Camp Holmes in Raleigh, North Carolina on November 2, 1863 at the age of 34. 



1st Muster Roll for Wyatt


Wyatt was captured by the enemy on May 12, 1864 during the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House.  He was originally confined to Point Lookout Prison, Maryland before being transferred to Elmira Prison, New York.



POW Roll showing Wyatt's capture


Wyatt was received at Elmira Prison on August 14, 1864.  He died from variola on February 15, 1865 at the age of 36. 


POW Roll showing Wyatt's death


Wyatt Currin is buried in Woodlawn National Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York along with the other Confederate Prisoners of War who died at Elmira.

Here's my relation to Wyatt:

Wyatt Currin (1829 - 1865)
is your 1st cousin 6x removed
Wyatt Currin (1794 - 1844)
father of Wyatt Currin
Hugh Currin (1744 - 1823)
father of Wyatt Currin
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
son of Hugh Currin
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
son of James Currin III
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Abner Currin
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Lewis L. Daniel was born in Granville County, North Carolina on July 31, 1838.  He is my 1st cousin 5x removed.  Lewis enlisted as a Private in Company I, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment in 1862 at the age of 23.

Lewis was admitted to Chimborazo Hospital No. 4 on September 6, 1862 for general debility, meaning he was very weak and feeble.  The nature of his illness is not known, however Lewis died from the disease on September 23, 1862 at the age of 24.


Sick and Wounded Report showing Lewis died from disease


His body was returned to his home of Granville County, North Carolina where it was buried in the Salem United Methodist Church Cemetery in Oxford, North Carolina.



Grave of Lewis L. Daniel


Here's my relation to Lewis:

Lewis L. Daniel (1838 - 1862)
is your 1st cousin 5x removed
Willis Daniel (1801 - 1886)
father of Lewis L. Daniel
William Ford Daniel (1774 - 1848)
father of Willis Daniel
L. Chesley Daniel (1806 - 1882)
son of William Ford Daniel
William Henry "Buck" Daniel (1827 - 1896)
son of L. Chesley Daniel
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of William Henry "Buck" Daniel
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



William Washington Hart was born in Granville County, North Carolina on January 17, 1845.  He is my 3rd cousin 5x removed.  William enlisted as a Private in Company I, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment on June 17, 1861 at that age of 17. 


1st Muster Roll for William


William was promoted to Full Corporal on March 15, 1862.  He was listed as present and accounted for until he surrendered with Robert E. Lee's troops at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, when he was given full parole.


Parole for William


Following the end of the Civil War, William returned home to Granville County, North Carolina where he lived for an additional 49 years.  William Washington Hart died in Granville County, North Carolina on April 19, 1914 at the age of 69.  He is buried in the Mountain Creek Baptist Church Cemetery in Oxford, North Carolina.


Grave of William Washington Hart


Here's my relation to William:

William Washington Hart (1845 - 1914)
is your 3rd cousin 5x removed
George Washington Hart (1808 - 1901)
father of William Washington Hart
John Hart (1783 - 1844)
father of George Washington Hart
Jane Pomfret (1751 - 1823)
mother of John Hart
John Pomfret (1720 - 1814)
father of Jane Pomfret
Frances Hunt Pomfret (1747 - 1826)
daughter of John Pomfret
Pomfret Blackwell (1769 - 1828)
son of Frances Hunt Pomfret
Phoebe Blackwell (1812 - 1860)
daughter of Pomfret Blackwell
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Phoebe Blackwell
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Robert Hester was born in Granville County, North Carolina on December 15, 1842.  He is my 2nd cousin 6x removed.  Robert enlisted as a Private in Company I, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment on June 17, 1861 at the age of 19.

1st Muster Roll for Robert


Robert received the Badge of Honor following the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 3, 1863.  His Roll of Honor citation states that he was "the most gallant man in Company I".  It also states that he was severely wounded.



Roll of Honor for Robert


Robert was listed as being present and accounted for until he surrendered with Robert E. Lee's troops at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, when he was issued parole.



Robert's Parole


Following the end of the Civil War, Robert returned home to Granville County, North Carolina where he lived until at least 1880.   Robert and his family relocated to Edgecombe County, North Carolina sometime after the 1880 Federal Census.  He lived an additional 34 years following the end of the Civil War.  Robert Hester died in Edgecombe County, North Carolina on December 25, 1899 at the age of 57.  He is buried in the Pineview Cemetery in Rocky Mount, Edgecombe County, North Carolina.



Grave of Robert Hester


Henry Jadson Hester was born in Oxford, Granville County, North Carolina on July 12, 1838.  He is also my 2nd cousin 6x removed.  Henry was the younger brother of Robert Hester.  Henry enlisted as a Sergeant in Company I, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment on June 17, 1861 at the age of  22. 



1st Muster Roll for Henry


Henry was wounded at the Battle of Seven Pines and the Battle of Chancellorsville.   His Roll of Honor citation states that he was "considered one of the most gallant soldiers in the Company".



Roll of Honor for Henry


Following his injury at Chancellorsville, Henry was admitted to Chimborazo Hospital No. 4 on May 6, 1863.  He was transferred to a hospital in Raleigh, North Carolina on May 23rd.



Hospital Register for Henry


General Robert E. Lee ordered that Henry be detailed as a teamster on the pontoon train on August 1, 1863. 


Special Order No. 210 showing General Lee had placed  Henry on duty as a teamster


Henry was detailed as a teamster from August 1, 1863 through October of 1864.  He returned to his Company in November of 1864.



Muster Roll showing Henry had returned to his Company


He was listed as present and accounted for through the end of the war.  Following the end of the Civil War, Henry returned home to Granville County, North Carolina, where he lived until at least 1880.  Henry and his family relocated to Wilson County, North Carolina sometime before 1900.  He and his family are found living in Wilson County in the 1900 Federal Census.  Henry was widowed sometime before 1920.  In 1920, Henry is found living in the Old Soldiers' Home in Raleigh, North Carolina. 



Raleigh Old Soldiers' Home, 1890-1938


Henry Jadson Hester lived an additional 62 years following the end of the Civil War.  He died at the Old Soldiers' in Raleigh, North Carolina on January 4, 1927 at the age of 88.  His burial location is not known at this time. 

Due to the fact that Robert and Henry Jadson Hester are brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart.

Here's my relation to Henry:

Henry Jadson Hester (1838 - 1927)
is your 2nd cousin 6x removed
Francis Hester Jr (1800 - 1864)
father of Henry Jadson Hester
Francis Hester (1767 - 1812)
father of Francis Hester Jr
William Stephen Hester (1716 - 1774)
father of Francis Hester
Mary Hester (1760 - 1818)
daughter of William Stephen Hester
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
son of Mary Hester
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
son of James Currin III
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Abner Currin
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce




Charles Fleming West was born in Granville County, North Carolina on January 12, 1837.  He is my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  Records indicate that he preferred to go by his middle name, Fleming.  Fleming enlisted as a Private in Company I, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment at "Waterloo" on June 17, 1861 at the age of 27. 

Fleming was taken prisoner at Boonsboro, Maryland during the Battle of South Mountain on September 15, 1862. 


POW Roll showing Fleming was capture on September 15, 1862


Fleming was paroled and returned to his Regiment sometime before January of 1862.  He was again taken prisoner, this time during the Battle of Gettysburg on July 1, 1863. 



Muster Roll showing Fleming was captured at Gettysburg


He was originally confined to Fort McHenry, Maryland before being transferred to Fort Delaware in July of 1863. 


POW Roll for Fleming


Fleming was again transferred, this time to Point Lookout, Maryland on October 18, 1863. 


POW Roll showing Fleming's transfer to Forth Delaware


Fleming was transferred to Hammond U.S. General Hospital at Point Lookout, Maryland, where he was paroled in March of 1864.


POW Roll showing Fleming's Parole


Following his parole, he was sent to Jackson Hospital in Richmond, Virginia to regain his strength.



Hospital Muster Roll for Fleming


Fleming returned to the Company in November of 1864. 


Muster Roll showing Fleming's return to the Company


He was listed as present and accounted for until he was surrendered with Robert E. Lee's troops at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865.


Parole for Fleming


Following the end of the Civil War, Fleming returned home to Granville County, North Carolina where he lived until at least 1890.   Fleming and his family are listed as living in Franklin County, North Carolina in the 1900 Federal Census, in Warren County in the 1910 Federal Census and in Vance County in the 1920 Federal Census. 

Charles Fleming West lived an additional 57 years following the end of the Civil War.  He died in Vance County, North Carolina on May 9, 1922.  His burial location is not known at this time. 



William Robert West was born in Granville County, North Carolina on February 14, 1841.  He is also my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  William was the younger brother of Fleming West.  According to records, he preferred to go by his middle name.  Robert enlisted as a Private in Company I, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment in Oxford, North Carolina on July 8, 1862 at the age of 21.



1st Muster for Robert


Robert was taken prisoner during the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House on May 12, 1864.


Muster Roll showing Robert was captured


He was originally confined to Point Lookout, Maryland on May 18, 1864 before being transferred to Elmira Prison on August 10, 1864.


POW Roll showing Robert's transfer


Robert was paroled from Elmira Prison on October 11, 1864.



Robert's Parole from Elmira Prison


Following his parole from Elmira Prison, Robert was exchanged at City Point, Virginia on October 29, 1864.


POW Roll showing Robert's exchange

'

Robert was again captured by Federal troops, this time near Petersburg, Virginia on March 25, 1865.  He arrived at City Point, Virginia on March 28th and was again sent to Point Lookout, Maryland.



POW Roll showing Robert's capture near Petersburg


Robert was released from Point Lookout, Maryland on June 22, 1865 after taking the Oath of Allegiance to the United States.


Oath of Allegiance for Robert


Following the end of the Civil War, Robert returned to Granville County, North Carolina where he lived until at least 1890.  He and his family are found living in Franklin County, North Carolina in the 1900 Federal Census.   William Robert West lived an additional 52 years after the end of the Civil War.  He died in Cedar Rock, Franklin County, North Carolina on January 25, 1917 at the age of 75.  William is buried in the White Level Baptist Church Cemetery in Louisburg, North Carolina.



Grave of William Robert West


Due to the fact that Fleming and Robert were brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart.

Here's my relation to Robert:

William Robert West (1841 - 1917)
is your 2nd cousin 5x removed
Mildred Currin (1820 - 1880)
mother of William Robert West
Wyatt Currin (1794 - 1844)
father of Mildred Currin
Hugh Currin (1744 - 1823)
father of Wyatt Currin
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
son of Hugh Currin
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
son of James Currin III
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Abner Currin
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Stephen Spencer West


Stephen Spencer West was born in Oxford, Granville County, North Carolina in 1837.  He is also my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  Stephen was the double first cousin of both Fleming and Robert West.  Their mother, Mildred Currin was the sister of Stephen's mother Nancy Currin, their Father Peter West was the brother of Stephen's father Thomas West.

Stephen enlisted as a Private in Company I, North Carolina 23rd Infantry Regiment on February 28, 1862 at the age of 25.


1st Muster for Stephen


He was listed as present and accounted for through April of 1863.   He was killed in action during the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863.


List showing Stephen was killed at Chancellorsville


Stephen's name appears on the Confederate Roll of Honor for being killed in Battle at Chancellorsville.



Roll of Honor for Stephen

Stephen Spencer West was 26 years old at the time of his death.   His burial location is not known at this time.   It is quite possible that Stephen lays in an unmarked grave near the Chancellorsville Battlefield.

Here's my relation to Stephen:

Stephen Spencer West (1837 - 1863)
is your 2nd cousin 5x removed
Nancy Currin (1817 - 1896)
mother of Stephen Spencer West
Wyatt Currin (1794 - 1844)
father of Nancy Currin
Hugh Currin (1744 - 1823)
father of Wyatt Currin
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
son of Hugh Currin
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
son of James Currin III
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Abner Currin
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce

2 comments:

  1. Chip,
    Nice website and quite a tribute. For your records, while in Charles Town WV, I happened upon the grave of Isaac Corey (Co. I) in Edge Hill Cemetery. There was a sizable section of marked Confederate graves an I suspect there was a hospital nearby. I do not know if Isaac was one of the soldiers who met my ancestor's regiment on Oak Ridge or if he was wounded in an earlier battle, but regardless, I wanted to bring his grave-site to your folks attention. Other than Johnathan Coghill, are you aware of any other letters/diaries that cover the battle on 1 Jul 63?
    V/r
    Mike Ayoub
    arclight88@hotmail.com
    Descendent of 88th Pennsylvania
    www.old88thPVI.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your Melanie & this Melanie are related!
    See below:
    WRD Bost (1823-1862)
    was my great, great grandfather
    Vaudrey Pinkney Bost (1852-1937)
    Son of WRD Bost (brother of your fiance’s Phillip Elcanah Bost)
    William Robert Davidson Bost (1879-1925)
    Son of Vaudrey Pickney Bost
    Nellie Bost Croft (1922-2015)
    Daughter of “Will” William Robert Davidson Bost
    Melanie Croft Dempsey (ME!)

    Enjoyed your blog...just went to Appomattox & had fun looking up the different regiments in which our ancestors served.

    ReplyDelete