Monday, October 22, 2012

The North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment's Participation in Pickett's/Pettigrew's Charge at Gettysburg: Fourteen Confederate Relatives

Battle Flag of the NC 55th, Captured at the Battle of Weldon Railroad , August 19, 1864


The North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment took part in one of the most daring attacks in the history of warfare.  Twelve of my relatives served in Company K of this Regiment.  Each of these men were from Granville County, North Carolina.  Most of them were farmers before the war.  Early in the war, several of these farmers were reported absent on "wheat furlough".  Wheat furlough is being allowed to return home for the harvest.  In the early part of the war, farmers were allowed to go home to take care of their crops as long as they promised to return to their regiment once all was taken care of at home.  In late1862, this practice had ceased. With the exception of James C. Currin, each of these men were wounded in battle at least once.  Most of these men were captured as prisoners of war for a time.  Several were wounded and captured during their participation in Pickett's/Pettigrew's Charge on July 3, 1863 during the Battle of Gettysburg. 

The North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment was organized at Camp Mangum, near Raleigh, North Carolina in May of 1862.  Its companies were recruited from the counties of Pitt, Wilson, Wilkes, Cleveland, Burke, Catawba, Johnston, Alexander, Onslow, Franklin, and Granville.  The men from Granville County made up Company K.  The unit served in the Department of North Carolina, then moved to Virginia where it was assigned to General J.R. Davis' Brigade.  While attached to Davis' Brigade, the unit would participate in the Nation's bloodiest battle, Gettysburg.  The regiment lost thirty-one percent of the 640 soldiers engaged at Gettysburg.


Davis Brigade marker at Gettysburg



Pickett's Charge by Edwin Forbes

On the 3rd of July, 1863, both Confederate and Federal forces had experienced stalemates and successes during previous two days at the Battle of Gettysburg.  On the final day of fighting, Confederate General Robert E. Lee thought he had an offensive plan of attack that could cripple the Army of the Potomac under Union Major General George G. Meade.  Lee's plan was for Confederate Artillery forces to bombard and soften up the Union Artillery positions that were supported by the 2nd Corps commanded by General Winfield Scott Hancock.  The artillery duel lasted for nearly 2 hours and is credited as being the longest artillery duel in the Civil War.  My 2nd Great Grandfather, George Patterson Vaden's Artillery Regiment, the Richmond Fayette Artillery attached to the Virginia 38th, supported Pickett's/Pettigrew's Charge from their rear position.

Once Lee thought the Federal Artillery position had been softened up, he ordered approximately 12,500 men in nine infantry brigades, one being the North Carolina 55th, to advance over open fields for three-quarters of a mile under heavy Union artillery and rifle fire.  Lee had instructed General James Longstreet's Corps to carry out the attack.  General Longstreet was opposed to the plan from its onset.  He claims to have told Lee:

General, I have been a soldier all my life. I have been with soldiers engaged in fights by couples, by squads, companies, regiments, divisions, and armies, and should know, as well as any one, what soldiers can do. It is my opinion that no fifteen thousand men ever arrayed for battle can take that position.
Despite his opposition, Longstreet carried out his commanding officer's command.  The men started marching toward the Union positions.  It became clear soon enough that the Union Artillery positions had not been softened up, but were merely silenced to appear that way.  Shot and shell poured into the marching Confederates.  Once they were within about 200 yards of the Union position at the stone wall, the Union guns started peppering the advancing Confederates with canister shot.  Wave after wave of Confederates were mowed down, still they continued the advance toward the stone wall.  Once they were within about 100 yards, the Federals began to fire deadly volleys of musket fire into the Confederate ranks.  Many Union soldiers shouted "Fredericksburg, Fredericksburg, Fredericksburg" at the advancing Confederates in reference to the failed Union charge on the Rebel position during the Battle of Fredericksburg in December of 1862, which was eerily similar to the failed charge led by Pickett and Pettigrew.


Map showing Pickett's/Pettigrew's Charge (NC 55th in the rear-middle behind Davis)


The 55th brigade commander Brigadier General Joseph R. Davis said:  
"When we approached the stone wall, we were subjected to a most galling fire of musketry and artillery, that so reduced the already thinned ranks...in the assault upon the enemy's position, the coolness and courage of officers and men are worthy of high commendation" 
Although most of the Confederates failed to make it to the stone wall several members of the 55th made it to the wall and beyond, thus giving birth to the accreditation "Farthest at Gettysburg."


NC 55th Flag.  Captured at Gettysburg


The infantry assault lasted about an hour.  The casualties were staggering.   Union forces suffered about 1,500 wounded or killed.  Pickett's division suffered 2,655 casualties (498 killed, 643 wounded, 833 wounded and captured, and 681 captured, unwounded). Pettigrew's losses were estimated to be about 2,700 (470 killed, 1,893 wounded, 337 captured).   Couple those with the losses of the other Confederate Forces and the Confederate casualty total numbered 6,555, of which at least 1,123 Confederates were killed on the battlefield, 4,019 were wounded, and a good number of the injured were also captured.   One of the men killed in action was my 1st cousin 5x removed, Thomas H. Currin.  Jeremiah Hamilton Currin, Louis Chesley Daniel, Thomas Brown Daniel, Rhodes Herndon Frazier and Marion Hamilton Hester were all wounded on July 3, 1863 while participating in Pickett's/Pettigrew's Charge at Gettysburg.  All but Jeremiah Hamilton Currin were captured.


The North Carolina Monument at Gettysburg

The statue represents a wounded officer pointing the way forward to the enemy while a veteran and younger comrade lead a color bearer in the charge. The statue was sculpted by Gutzon Borglum of Mt. Rushmore fame, using photographs of Confederate veterans as models. Orren Smith of North Carolina, the model for the color bearer, was the designer of the Confederate national flag. It was dedicated on July 3, 1929An interesting side note, Orren Randolph Smith is the ancestor of my good friends Hoot and Tyson Stahl.


First National Flag of the Confederacy, designed by Orren Randolph Smith


Below are brief biographies of all fourteen of my ancestors that served in the North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment, all serving in Company K. 

Private Alexander Adcock


Alexander Adcock was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1836.  He is my 3rd cousin 5x removed.  Alexander enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment on March 1, 1862 at the age of 26.  Alex only served with the Regiment for five short months.  He unfortunately died from disease while in camp at Goldsboro, North Carolina on August 15, 1862.  He was 26 years old at the time of his death.  He was buried alongside several other Confederate soldiers in the Willow Dale Cemetery in Goldsboro. 

Confederate Memorial in Willow Dale Cemeter

Tablet on Confederate Memorial


James Wesley "Jim" Adcock was born in Granville County, North Carolina on September 20, 1833.  He was the oldest brother of Alexander and Henry Clay Adcock.  Jim was also my 3rd cousin 5x removed. 


James Wesley "Jim" Adcock

Jim enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment in Granville County, North Carolina on May 6, 1862 at the age of 28.  Prior to the war, Jim was listed as being a farmer.


1st Muster Roll for Jim

Jim was wounded in the thigh and hip and captured at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 3, 1863.  Following his capture he was sent to Fort Delaware Prison, where he would remain until he was paroled on July 30, 1862.

POW Roll for Jim showing his parole

Following his parole, Jim was sent to recover at a Confederate Hospital near Petersburg, Virginia.   Jim survived the Civil War and returned home to Granville County, where he resumed farming.  He lived an additional 59 years following the end of the Civil War.  He is buried in the Adcock family cemetery in Oack Hill, Granville County, North Carolina.


Adcock Cemetery, Granville County


The youngest Adcock brother was Henry Clay Adcock.  He was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1845.

Henry Clay Adcock

Henry enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment on March 1, 1861 at the age of 17. 

1st Muster Roll for Henry

Henry was listed as present and accounted for through April of 1865.  He was paroled on April 9, 1865 with Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House. 

Parole for Henry


Following the end of the Civil War, Henry returned home to Granville County, North Carolina.  On January 16, 1866 he married Lizzy Ann Vaughn.  The couple would have 4 children between the years of 1874 - 1884.  On July 1, 1888, Lizzy Ann Vaughn died unexpectedly.  The apparent cause of death was poisoning.  On August 2, 1888, Henry Clay Adcock and Jane Adcock (wife of John Wesley Adcock) were arrested for the murder.  Newspaper articles claimed that Henry was obsessed with his sister-in-law Jane and had had several fights with his brother Jim regarding the subject and also their father's will (Henry was named executor and Jim didn't like it.)  The articles claimed that Henry had killed his wife so that he could finally be with his sister-in-law.  The couples was initially held in the Oxford Jail in Granville County, but they were moved to the Wake County Jail for their protection from threats of lynching.  The trial took place in Vance County.  The case against Jane was dismissed for lack of evidence, however Henry was found guilty and sentenced to the asylum at Dorothea Dix Mental Hospital.   Henry's descendants refute the murder charge and offer another explanation.   According to great grandaughter Mary, "I doubt if Henry would have poisoned the mother of his children.  Considering what they had to work with for refrigeration in those days, she probably drank spoiled buttermilk."

According to records from Dorothea Dix, Henry was admitted for "melancholia" on February 25, 1889.  The duration of this illness was several months prior to his admittance.  He escaped from Dorothea Dix on April 16, 1890 and was never seen nor heard of ever again.

Since I share the same relation with all 3 Adcock brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart:

Here's my relation to Henry:

Henry Clay Adcock (1845 - ????)
is your 3rd cousin 4x removed
Burgess Adcock (1805 - 1884)
father of Henry Clay Adcock
William Adcock (1781 - 1866)
father of Burgess Adcock
Edward Connaway Adcock (1760 - 1799)
father of William Adcock
John Adcock (1705 - 1780)
father of Edward Connaway Adcock
Bolling Adcock (1737 - 1804)
son of John Adcock
William Adcock (1790 - 1858)
son of Bolling Adcock
Annie Tyson "Fanny" Adcock (1835 - 1912)
daughter of William Adcock
William Allen Moss (1859 - 1931)
son of Annie Tyson "Fanny" Adcock
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of William Allen Moss
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce




Pomphret Blackwell was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1832.  He is my 1st cousin 5x removed.  He enlisted in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment on February 10, 1863, for the duration of the war.  Pomphret was 36 years old at the time of his enlistment. 


1st Muster Roll for Pomphret

Pomphret Blackwell was captured at Falling Waters, Maryland on July 14, 1863. 


Muster Roll showing Pomphret was captured at Falling Waters, MD

He was then confined at Point Lookout, Maryland on July 21, 1863.  Pomphret was paroled at Point Lookout on March 16, 1864 and then sent to City Point, Virginia on March 20, 1864 for prisoner exchange. 


POW Roll showing Pomphret's exchange at City Point

He returned to duty on unspecified date.  Pomphret was captured for a second time at Globe Tavern, Virginia on August 20, 1864.  He was again confined to Point Lookout on August 24, 1864. 


POW Roll showing Pomphret's 2nd prisoner exchange

Pomphret was paroled at Point Lookout on March 14, 1865.  He was received at Boulware's Wharf, James River, for another prisoner exchange.  Pomphret Blackwell survived the war and died sometime after 1880, presumably back home in Granville County, North Carolina.  His burial location is unknown at the time of this entry. 

Here's my relation to Pomphret:

Pomphret Blackwell (1832 - 1880)
is your 1st cousin 5x removed
Stephen Blackwell (1802 - 1860)
Father of Pomphret
Pomfret Blackwell (1769 - 1828)
Father of Stephen
Phoebe Blackwell (1812 - 1860)
Daughter of Pomfret
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Phoebe
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


James C. Currin was born in Granville County, North Carolina on March 22, 1836.  He is my 1st cousin 6x removed.  James is the younger brother of Lotan G. W. Currin.  He was a farmer prior to his enlistment at age 26.  James enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment on May 6, 1862.


1st Muster for James C. Currin

He was reported absent on wheat furlough in June 1862. 


Muster showing James was absent on wheat furlough

James was reported in hospital in Richmond, Virgina on November 11 - 12, 1863. 



Hospital Muster roll for James C.

He was reported present in May-June, 1864.  James was again reported absent on furlough in Sept - Oct, 1864. 


James C. Currin


James C. Currin Homeplace in Granville County

James C. Currin survived the Civil War and lived for an additional 50 years.  He died in Granville County, North Carolina on august 13, 1915.  He is buried on his family's homeplace in Granville County. 


Currin graves at Currin Homeplace in Granville County

Here's my relation to James C:

James C. Currin (1836 - 1915)
is your 1st cousin 6x removed
Benjamin Currin (1802 - 1862)
Father of James C.
Hugh Currin (1744 - 1823)
Father of Benjamin
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
Son of Hugh
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
Son of James
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Abner
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


Jeremiah Hamilton Currin was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1832.  He is my 4th Great Grand Uncle.  He resided as a farmer prior to his enlistment at age 29.  Jeremiah enlisted in Granville County on May 6, 1862, for the duration of the war.  He was mustered in as a Sergeant. 


1st Muster Roll for Jeremiah

Jeremiah was reported present in June 1862.  He was wounded in the head at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863 and returned to duty on unspecified date.  He was reported present in May-June and Sept-Oct. 1864.  Jeremiah Hamilton Currin survived the war, however he would only live an additional three years following the Civil War.  He died in Granville County in 1868.  He was only 36 years old at the time of his death.   His burial location is unknown at the time of this entry. 

Here's my relation to Jeremiah:

Jeremiah Hamilton Currin (1832 - 1868)
is your 4th great grand uncle
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
Father of Jeremiah Hamilton
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
Son of James
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Abner
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


Lotan G. W. Currin was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1827.  He is my 1st cousin 6x removed and the older brother of James C. Currin.  Lotan was a farmer prior to his enlistment at age 36  He enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment on February 10, 1863, for the duration of the war.  He was hospitalized in Richmond, Virginia on May 7, 1864 with a gunshot wound to the right foot, probably sustained in the Wilderness on May 5, 1864.


Muster Roll showing Lotan was absent due to being wounded
He was reported absent wounded through October, 1864.  Lotan G. W. Currin survived the war and lived an additional 32 years.  He died in Granville County, North Carolina in 1897.  He is buried in the Hester Baptist Church Cemetery near Oxford, North Carolina

Lotan Currin's grave

Here's my relation to Lotan:

Lotan G. W. Currin (1827 - 1897)
is your 1st cousin 6x removed
Benjamin Currin (1802 - 1862)
Father of Lotan G. W.
Hugh Currin (1744 - 1823)
Father of Benjamin
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
Son of Hugh
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
Son of James
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Abner
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


Thomas H. Currin was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1838.  He is my 1st Cousin 5x removed.  He was a farmer prior to his enlistment at age 23.  Thomas enlisted as a Private on May 6, 1862 for the duration of the war. 


1st Muster Roll for Thomas H. Currin

Thomas was reported absent on wheat furlough in June 1862. 


Muster showing Thomas Currin was absent on wheat furlough

Thomas returned to duty on an unspecified date.  He was reported missing at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863 where he was presumably killed. 


Muster Roll showing where Thomas was "captured" on July 3, 1863

Thomas had previously served as 2nd Lieutenant in NC 42nd Infantry Regiment in 1861.  The location of his burial is unknown.  It's quite possible that Thomas H. Currin lies buried on the field where he lost his life.

Here's my relation to Thomas:

Thomas H. Currin (1838 - 1863)
is your 1st cousin 5x removed
Sarah "Sally" Blackwell (1801 - 1876)
Mother of Thomas H.
Pomfret Blackwell (1769 - 1828)
Father of Sarah "Sally"
Phoebe Blackwell (1812 - 1860)
Daughter of Pomfret
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Phoebe
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


Louis Chesley Daniel was born in Granville County, North Carolina in May of 1843.  He is my 3rd Great Grand Uncle.  He is the younger brother of Thomas Brown Daniel. Louis enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment on May 6, 1862.  He was 19 years.  Louis was wounded in the head, foot and shoulder (possibly also in the arm) at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863.  He returned to duty on unspecified date.  Louis was hospitalized in Richmond, Virgina on January 29, 1864 with intermittent fever.  He returned to duty on Feb 26, 1864. 


Hospital Report showing Louis' return to duty

Louis was hospitalized again Richmond, VA on May 26, 1864 with debility.  He returned to duty on June 13, 1864.


Hospital Roll showing debility and return to duty

Louis was wounded in right forearm at Globe Tavern, Virginia on August 19, 1864.  He was hospitalized in Richmond.  Louis was furloughed on September 2, 1864 and returned to duty prior to November 1, 1864.  Louis Chesley Daniel was cited on Confederate "Roll of Honor" for gallantry at Globe Tavern on Aug. 19, 1864.  

Confederate Roll of Honor card for Louis

He survived the war and died in Granville County on September 8, 1928.  He was 85 years old.  Louis is buried in the Concord Baptist Church Cemetery in Creedmoor, North Carolina.


Louis Chesley Daniel's grave


Thomas Brown Daniel was born in Granville County, North Carolina on March 10, 1834.  He was the older brother of Louis Chesley Daniel.  He is also my 3rd Great Grand Uncle.  He was a farmer prior to his enlistment at age 28.  Thomas enlisted in Granville County on May 6, 1862, for the duration of the war. 


1st Muster and Descriptive Roll for Thomas

He was reported present in June, 1862.  Thomas was wounded in head and captured at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863.  He returned to duty at an unspecified date.  He was reported present in May-June, September 1864.  Thomas was reported in the Hospital near Petersburg, Virginia on January 5, 1865 where he was described as being "very bad off with the scurvie [sic]."


Thomas Brown Daniel


Thomas Brown Daniel later in life


Thomas Brown Daniel survived for an additional 46 years following the Civil War.  He died in Granville County, North Carolina on April 14, 1911.   He was 76 years old.  He is buried in the Tommie Daniel Cemetery on the grounds of his old homeplace in Granville County, North Carolina. 


Thomas Brown Daniel's grave

Since Louis and Thomas were brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart.

Here's my relation to both Louis and Thomas:

Thomas Brown Daniel (1834 - 1911)
is your 3rd great grand uncle
L. Chesley Daniel (1806 - 1882)
Father of Thomas Brown
William Henry "Buck" Daniel (1827 - 1896)
Son of L. Chesley
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of William Henry "Buck"
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


Augustus Dennis Frazier was born in Granville County, North Carolina on June 10, 1833.  He is my 1st Cousin 5x removed. Augustus was a farmer prior to enlisting at age 28.  He enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment in Granville County on May 6, 1862, for the duration of the war. 


1st Muster Roll for Augustus

Augustus was absent on wheat furlough in June of 1862. 


Muster Roll showing Augustus was absent on wheat furlough

He returned to duty on an unspecified date.  Augustus was wounded in head at the Battle of the Wilderness in Virginia on May 5, 1864.  He returned to duty prior to July 1, 1864.  He was reported present Sept - Oct 1864.  Augustus Dennis Frazier lived an additional 38 years after the Civil War.  He died in Granville County, North Carolina on April 9, 1903.  He is buried in the Mount Zion Church Cemetery in Berea, Granville County, North Carolina.


Augustus Dennis Frazier's grave

Here's my relation to Augustus:

Augustus Dennis Frazier (1833 - 1903)
is your 1st cousin 5x removed
Elizabeth Currin (1815 - 1854)
Mother of Augustus Dennis
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
Father of Elizabeth
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
Son of James
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Abner
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


Rhodes Herndon Frazier was born in Granville County, North Carolina on May 27, 1833.  He was a farmer prior to his enlistment at age 28.  Rhodes enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment in Granville County on May 6, 1862, for the duration of the war. 


1st Muster Roll for Rhodes

Rhodes was wounded and captured at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863.  He was hospitalized at David's Island in New York Harbor on July 20, 1863 and paroled on August 24, 1863. 


POW Roll showing Rhodes' parole from David's Island

Rhodes was received at City Point, Virginia on August 28, 1863, for a prisoner exchange.  He returned to duty on an unspecified date  Rhodes was wounded in right hand resulting in a fracture at Globe Tavern, Virginia on August 18, 1863. The injury led to the amputation of his right forearm. 


Medical Slip showing Rhodes' 2nd injury

He was retired to the Invalid Corps on December 15, 1864.



Register showing Rhodes retirement to the Invalid Corps

Rhodes Herndon Frazier

Rhodes Herndon Frazier lived an additional 46 years following the Civil War.  He died in Granville County, North Carolina on September 13, 1911.  He was 78 years old.   He is buried in the Frazier Family Cemetery on the grounds of his old homeplace near Oxford, Granville County, North Carolina.


Rhodes Herndon Frazier's grave

Here's my relation to Rhodes:

Rhodes Herndon Frazier (1833 - 1911)
is your 1st cousin 7x removed
Howell Frazier (1780 - 1860)
Father of Rhodes Herndon
Jeremiah Frazier (1734 - 1809)
Father of Howell
Jeremiah Frazier (1764 - 1818)
Son of Jeremiah
Lucy B. Frazier (1791 - 1859)
Daughter of Jeremiah
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
Son of Lucy B.
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Abner
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Marion Hamilton Hester was born in Granville County, North Carolina on April 19, 1840.   He is my 2nd cousin 6x removed.  Prior to the Civil War he was a Farmer by trade.  Marion enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment on June 5, 1862.  He was 22 years old. 


1st Muster Roll for Marion

Marion was wounded in the leg on July 3, 1863 during his participation in Pickett's/Pettigrew's Charge.


List showing Marion's capture

Following his injury, Marion was taken as a Prisoner of War and sent to Point Lookout, Maryland.  Following a brief stint at Point Lookout, Marion was sent via Baltiomore, Maryland to City Point, Virginia, where he took part in a prisoner exchange.


POW Roll showing Marion's Exchange

Marion Hamilton Hester lived an additional 52 years after the end of the Civil War.  He died in Granville County, North Carolina on October 16, 1917.  He was 77 years old.  His burial location is not known at the time of this entry.

Marion Hamilton Hester

Marion's brother, Benjamin Franklin Hester was the private secretary for the North Carolina Secretary of State between 1861 - 1865.  It is reported that he secured State records when Sherman made his march through the South.

Here's my relation to Marion:

Marion Hamilton Hester (1840 - 1917)
is your 2nd cousin 6x removed
Hamilton Hester (1796 - 1860)
Father of Marion Hamilton
Zachariah Hamilton Hester (1761 - 1837)
Father of Hamilton
William Stephen Hester (1716 - 1774)
Father of Zachariah Hamilton
Mary Hester (1760 - 1818)
Daughter of William Stephen
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
Son of Mary
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
Son of James
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Abner
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce





Zachariah Goodman Daniel



Zachariah Goodman Daniel was born in Halifax County, Virginia on April 19, 1836.  He is my 1st cousin 6x removed.   I wasn't aware of Zachariah's connection to Louis Chesley and Thomas Brown Daniel until one of his descendants emailed me about this blog entry.   Together, we were able to connect the dots.  Zachariah was first cousins with Louis Chesley and Thomas Brown Daniel.  By 1860, Zachariah had relocated to Granville County, North Carolina.  Marriage Records indicate he married Martha Jane Critcher in Granville County on March 28, 1860.  Prior to the war, he was a farmer by trade.  Zachariah enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment on May 6, 1862 at the age of 26.  The Company Descriptive book lists him as being 5'5". 


1st Muster Roll for Zachariah

He was listed as present and accounted for through June of 1863.  On July 3, 1863,  he was wounded and captured during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Zachariah was sent to Fort Delaware on July 9, 1863. 


POW Roll showing Zachariah's capture

He was transferred to Point Lookout on October 20, 1863. 



POW Roll showing Zachariah's transfer to Point Lookout

Zachariah was paroled from Point Lookout on February 13, 1865 and exchanged at Cox's Landing, James River Virginia on February 15, 1865. 


Muster Roll showing Zachariah's exchange


Zachariah Goodman Daniel lived an additional 44 years following the end of the Civil War.  He returned to Granville County and resumed farming.   He died in Granville County on September 23, 1909 at the age of 73.  He is buried in the Critcher Family Cemetery in Oxford, North Carolina.   A picture of his grave was not available at the time of this entry.   I hope to remedy that soon. 

Here's my relation to Zachariah:

Zachariah Goodman Daniel (1836 - 1909)
is your 1st cousin 6x removed
Samuel Daniel (1790 - 1844)
father of Zachariah Goodman Daniel
Josiah Daniel (1744 - 1811)
father of Samuel Daniel
William Ford Daniel (1774 - 1848)
son of Josiah Daniel
L. Chesley Daniel (1806 - 1882)
son of William Ford Daniel
William Henry "Buck" Daniel (1827 - 1896)
son of L. Chesley Daniel
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of William Henry "Buck" Daniel
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce




John T. Stovall was born in Granville County, North Carolina on December 26, 1844.  He is my 3rd cousin 5x removed.  John was the younger brother of Wilkins.  He enlisted as a Private in Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment on July 1, 1863, just two days before the infamous Pickett's/Pettigrew's Charge.  John was 18 years old at the time of his enlistment.  John was wounded on his 3rd day of Confederate service in Pickett's/Pettigrew's charge.


Roll of Honor for John showing his injury at Gettysburg


John was captured at Greencastle on July 5, 1863.  Due to his injury from July 3rd, he was sent to the United States General Hospital in Chester, Pennsylvania.


POW Roll showing John was in a Federal Hospital


Following his recovery, John was paroled.  He was sent to City Point, Virginia where he was exchanged on September 17, 1863.


Hospital Muster Roll showing John was sent to City Point for exchange


John returned to his Regiment in late September of 1863.  He was listed as being present and accounted for through April of 1864.   John was killed in action during the Battle of the Wilderness on May 14, 1864.  He was 19 years old at the time of his death.   On December 10, 1864, in accordance with General Order No. 87, John was posthumously nominated for the Confederate Honor Roll, stating he displayed courage and devotion in the Battle of the Wilderness.







John's body was returned to Stovall, Granville County, North Carolina where it was buried in the Stovall Family Cemetery. 




Wilkins Stovall was born in Granville County, North Carolina on June 23, 1836.  He is my 3rd cousin 5x removed.  Wilkins previously served as a Private in Company D, North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment.  He was promoted to 3rd Lieutenant on May 1, 1862 and transferred to Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment.  Wilkins was officially mustered in to the North Carolina 55th on May 20, 1862.  He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant on May 30, 1862.


1st Muster in the NC 55th for Wilkins


Wilkins continued to rise up the ranks in the Confederate Army.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on March 10, 1863.  Wilkins was one of the lucky few that wasn't wounded in Pickett's/Pettigrew's Charge.  Just a few days later, at the Battle of Falling Waters on July 14, 1863, Wilkins was captured by Federal troops.  He was originally confined to Old Capitol Prison, Washington D. C. on July 23, 1863. 




POW Roll for Wilkins at Old Capitol Prison


On August 1, 1863, he was transferred to Johnson's Island Prison, Sandusky Ohio.




POW Roll showing Wilkins was trasnferred to Johnson's Island


Wilkins remained confined to Johnson's Island until after the end of the war.  He was released on June 11, 1865 after taking the oath of allegiance to the United States. 



Oath of Allegiance for Wilkins


Following his release, Wilkins Stovall returned to Granville County, North Carolina, where he resumed farming.  He lived an additional 56 years following the end of the Civil War.  Wilkins died in Granville County, North Carolina on April 7, 1921 at the age of 84.  He is buried in the Stovall Family Cemetery in Stovall, Granville County, North Carolina. 



Grave of Wilkins Stovall


Here's my relation to Wilkins:

John Walker Stovall (1814 - 1899)
father of Wilkins Stovall
Wilkins Stovall (1785 - 1826)
father of John Walker Stovall
John Stovall (1736 - 1781)
father of Wilkins Stovall
John Bartholomew Stovall (1706 - 1781)
father of John Stovall
Josiah Stovall Sr. (1749 - 1798)
son of John Bartholomew Stovall
Rebecca Stovall (1772 - 1852)
daughter of Josiah Stovall Sr.
Phoebe Blackwell (1812 - 1860)
daughter of Rebecca Stovall
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Phoebe Blackwell
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce

4 comments:

  1. Please contact me at jessdaniel2000@yahoo.com

    I am related to Daniel's in the NC 55th.

    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Louis Chesley Daniel was my maturnal Great Grandfather. I have the same information that you posted. Louis' four wounds in Pickett's Charge can most likely be attributed to his being a flag bearer. The only thing I don't recall hearing, is that he was captured. My name is Gary D. Roberts and I reside near Creedmoor, NC. Phone: (919)528-2239 gmail: grobertshwy17@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for posting a bit on my family history. I am the great 3x niece of Wilkins and John Stovall.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm related to Rhodes Herndon Frazier and Augustus Dennis Frazier - he was my 4th great grandfather.

    ReplyDelete