Tuesday, October 30, 2012

"The Granville Rangers" Company G, North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment at the Battle of Antietam: The Sunken Road a/k/a Bloody Lane.

Close up of the North Carolina 30th's Insignia on their Appomattox Battle Flag

Full View of the North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment's Appomattox Battle Flag

Although ten of my ancestors originally started out in the North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment, only seven of these men saw action at the Battle of Antietam.   One relative was discharged prior to the battle, another furnished a substitute in April of 1862, another had deserted for a four month stint in the fall of 1862.  My 1st cousin 5x removed, James H. Frazier, was wounded during his participation at the Battle of Antietam.


The North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment was organized at Camp Mangum, near Raleigh, North Carolina in October of 1861.  It's recruits came from Sampson, Warren, Brunswick, Wake, Nash, Granville, Duplin, Edgecombe, Moore, and Mecklenburg Counties.  The 30th was originally assigned to the District of Cape Fear, Department of North Carolina.  The Unit reported to Camp Wyatt, near Fort Fisher in Wilmington where they drilled for the Winter of 1861.


Panoramic view of what remains of Fort Fisher


View of remaining Battery at Fort Fisher


Following their brief stint in Wilmington, the unit was reassigned to the Army of Northern Virginia, General Daniel Harvey Hill's Division, Brigadier General George B. Anderson's Brigade in June of 1862.  Along with the North Carolina 30th, Anderson's Brigade included the North Carolina 2nd, 4th and 14th Infantry Regiments.  Anderson's Brigade saw action in the Seven Days Battles from June 25 - July 1, 1862.  In late August, the Brigade would begin their march north towards Maryland.  Lee's strategy was to take the battle into enemy territory in hopes to lure Federal troops out of Virginia.  A battle on September 14, 1862 at South Mountain, Maryland would serve as the prelude to America's bloodiest single day battle, Antietam. 

The Battle of Antietam took place on September 17, 1862.  The combatants were the roughly 45,000 soldiers from the Confederate's Army of Northern Virginia under the command of General Robert E. Lee and the roughly 87,000 soldiers from the Union's Army of the Potomac under the command of General George B. McClellan.  On September 15th , General D. H. Hill's Division took center position in between Stonewall Jackson's (on the left) and General James Longstreet's Division (on the right).

Jackson's troops on the Confederate left, were the target of a Federal attack on the morning of September 17th.  Three brigades belonging to D. H. Hill were ordered to support Jackson.  Anderson's brigade was ordered to extend its line to cover the vacated area.  Suddenly the Union attack shifted to the Confederate center where Anderson's and General Robert E. Rodes were positioned in the Sunken Road, later known as "Bloody Lane".   The North Carolina 30th Infantry Brigade was positioned at the extreme right of Anderson's Brigade.


 
Map showing Anderson's Brigade on the Sunken Road at approximately 9:00am on September 17, 1862


The Union II Corps attack on the Sunken Road was persistent.   Federal forces succeeded by firing from their flanking position along the length of the Confederate battle line.  This caused confusion in Rodes's Division.  An order to form a line perpendicular to the road was misunderstood as an order to withdraw.  Anderson's men continued to hold their position.   Federal forces moved in on Anderson's front and flank. 



Brigadier General George Burgwyn Anderson


General Anderson's veteran North Carolinians defended a portion of the Sunken Road known as "Bloody Lane" against repeated Union attacks.  A Minié ball struck Anderson near his ankle, injuring it badly.  Anderson's Brigade was routed.  The North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment numbered about 250 men before the Battle.  Their losses were 10 killed, 62 wounded, and one man missing for a total of
76 casualties.   The Confederate forces rallied and attempted an unsuccessful assault on the Federal position.  By the end of the day, there would be 22,717 American casualties, 12,401 Union (2,108 killed, 9,540 wounded, 753 missing or captured)  and 10,316 Confederate (1,546 killed, 7,752 wounded, 1,018 missing or captured).  The Battle of Antietam was the single bloodiest day in the history of the United States of America. 


General George B. Anderson's Marker on the Antietam Battlefield.




Close up of the Anderson Marker


General Anderson was initially transported to Shepherdstown and then by wagon up the Shenandoah Valley to Staunton, Virginia to recuperate. He was eventually shipped by train to Raleigh, North Carolina, where he died following surgery to amputate the infected foot on October 16, 1862.   George Burgwyn Anderson is buried in Raleigh's historic Oakwood Cemetery.




Grave of General George Burgwyn Anderson

Close up of inscription

Close up of Battles fought

Close up of 2nd National Flag of the Confederacy


The following is Major W. W. Sillers After Battle Report for the North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment's participation in the Battle of Antietam:


EIGHT MILES NORTH OF WINCHESTER, VA.,
October 13, 1862.
In obedience to orders, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Thirtieth Regiment North Carolina Troops in the battle of Sharpsburg, September 17, to wit:

Supposing that the main road which leads from the bridge across Antietam Creek through the center of Sharpsburg to run north and south, our brigade took position northwest and about half a mile from the town, and the Thirtieth Regiment was on the right of the brigade. Our line was formed in a road which, by the wear of travel, had been let down to the depots of a foot or more into the earth. In front of the right wing of our regiment, and at a distance of not more than 50 paces, there was a ravine which, extending diagonally to the left, gradually narrowed down the level space in front until in front of the extreme left of the Thirtieth there was not more than 30 paces of level ground. Our position was taken, I suppose, about 8.30 a.m. In the space of half or three-quarters of an hour the enemy made his appearance, crossed the ravine, and began his advance up the hill. A well-directed fire broke his line and drove him back. Up to this time, as far as the eye could reach to the right (300 yards), there was no support to our brigade; but about this time Brig.-Gen. Wright's brigade came up. The enemy continued to make his appearance, first on one hill then another, but always at long range. The line was ordered to advance, and halted on the edge of the ravine. Here a hot fire was kept for a few minutes. Soon the line was ordered to take its first position, and did so. In a very short time Col. Parker passed me, retiring, seriously wounded, from the field. From this time, about 11.30 a.m, the regiment was under my command. A desultory fire was kept up for some time, the enemy making demonstrations in front of the brigade on our right. Our fire at this point was not very effective, the range being too great and a fence intervening. Soon my attention was called to our right, which was again unsupported. Almost immediately my attention was called to the opposite flank (the left), which was uncovered as far as I could see. I sent a captain to the left to see if any one was there,
and he reported no one. I then gave the order to fall back. We retired about 300 yards. Here we made a stand. Twice we advanced from this point, and twice we fell back to it. A short time before sunset the enemy advanced. We joined in a charge against them, and drove them so effectually that they did not appear again. In our last position we were under a pretty severe fire from artillery, playing on the front and flank. Here we remained until after nightfall, when we were withdrawn by order of Maj. Gen. D.H. Hill.

The regiment before the fight numbered about 250, all told. We lost in killed, 10, in wounded, 62, and in missing, 1, making a total of 76. I brought off from the fight 159.

Very respectfully submitted.

W.W. SILLERS,
Maj., Commanding.

Col. W.P. BYNUM,
Commanding Brigade.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 19. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 27

Below are brief biographies of each of my seven ancestors that served in the North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment:

William Adolphus Cheatham was born in Granville County, North Carolina on May 17, 1836.  He is my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  William enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 30th Infantry in Oxford, North Carolina on September 7, 1861 at the age of 25. 


1st Muster Roll for William

According to Confederate records, William was listed as present and account for through September of 1864 with the exception of being sent to the hospital to recover from illnesses on December 27, 1861 (returned to duty in January 1862),  August 18, 1862 (returned to duty September 1862), July 23, 1863 (returned to duty August 1863), and January 16, 1864 (returned to duty in February 1864). 

William was captured by Federal General Sheridan's forces at Fisher's Hill, Virginia on September 22, 1864.  He was sent to Point Lookout, Maryland on October 1, 1864. 


POW roll showing William was captured on September 22, 1864


William remained confind to Point Lookout Prison, Maryland until February 13, 1865, when he was sent to City Point, Virginia for a prisoner exchange. 


POW Roll showing William's exchange

Following the war, William returned home to Granville County, North Carolina where he lived an additional 27 years.  William Adolphus Cheatham died in Granville County, North Carolina in 1892 at the age of 56.  His burial location is not known at this time. 



David Thomas Cheatham was born in Granville County, North Carolina on February 2, 1838.  He is also my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  David was the younger brother of William Adolphus Cheatham.  He enlisted as a Corporal in Company G, North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment in Oxford, North Carolina on September 7, 1861 at the age of 23. 


1st Muster Roll for David


David appeared on a list of casualties of Brigadier General Ramseur's Brigade in the battles at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on July 2 and 3, 1863, stating that he had been wounded badly through the thigh. 


Casualty List showing David's injury at Gettysburg


Following the Battle of Gettysburg, David returned home to Granville County to recuperate.  He did not return to his Regiment, instead he provided a substitue in late 1863.  David Thomas Cheatham lived an additional  50 years following the end of the Civil War.  He died in Oxford, Granville County, North Carolina on December 9, 1915 at the age of  77.  He is buried in Elmwood Cemetery in Oxford, North Carolina.


Grave of David Thomas Cheatham


James Theodore Cheatham was born in Granville County, North Carolina on August 10, 1844.  He is also my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  James was the younger brother of William Adolphus and David Thomas Cheatham.  James enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment in Oxford, North Carolina on July 25, 1862 at the age of 17. 


1st Muster for James


James was wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on July 3, 1863 and left behind enemy lines. 


Muster Roll showing James was wounded at Gettysburg


James was paroled and exchanged at Camp Lee, near Richmond, Virginia on August 31, 1863.  According to Confederate records, he was sent home to recover. 


Muster Roll showing James was paroled and exchanged
 
James returned to duty in September of 1863.  He was listed as present and accounted for through June of 1864.  He was captured near Washington on July 12, 1864.  He was originally confined to Old Capitol Prison, Washington D.C. on July 13, 1864 before being sent to Elmira Prison, New York on July 25, 1864.


POW Roll for James


He was released from Elmira Prison on June 12, 1865 after taking the Oath of Allegiance to the United States. 

Oath of Allegiance for James


Following his release, James returned home to Granville County, North Carolina where he lived an additional 41 years.  James Theodore Cheatham died in Oxford, Granville County, North Carolina on March 29, 1906 at the age of 61.  He is buried in the Cheatham Family Cemetery near Oxford, North Carolina.


Cheatham Family Cemetery


Due to the fact that the Cheathams were all brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart. 

Here's my relation to James Theodore Cheatham:

James Theodore Cheatham (1844 - 1906)
is your 2nd cousin 5x removed
Rebecca Ann Crews (1818 - 1899)
mother of James Theodore Cheatham
James Crews (1785 - 1875)
father of Rebecca Ann Crews
Gideon Crews (1730 - 1815)
father of James Crews
Abigail Crews (1775 - 1822)
daughter of Gideon Crews
L. Chesley Daniel (1806 - 1882)
son of Abigail Crews
William Henry "Buck" Daniel (1827 - 1896)
son of L. Chesley Daniel
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of William Henry "Buck" Daniel
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce




George Washington Currin was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1832.  He is my 1st cousin 6x removed.  George enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment at the age of 29 on September 7, 1861. 


1st Muster Roll for George

He was discharged on October 22, 1861, by reason of "hernia".


George's discharge
George Washington Currin only lived for about one year following the Civil War.  He died in Granville County, North Carolina in 1866.   His burial location is not known at the time of this entry.

Here's my relation to George:

George Washington Currin (1832 - 1866)
is your 1st cousin 6x removed
Benjamin Currin (1802 - 1862)
Father of George Washington
Hugh Currin (1744 - 1823)
Father of Benjamin
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
Son of Hugh
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
Son of James
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Abner
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce  


Ralph "Rafe" Currin was born in Granville County, North Carolina on April 5, 1842. He is my 2nd cousin 5x removed.  He enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina, 30th Infantry Regiment at the age of 18 on May 1, 1862, for the duration war. 


1st Muster Roll for Rafe

Rafe was present and accounted for until he deserted on June 22, 1862.   He was reportedly "lurking in the woods in Granville County" during the months of  September - December of 1862. 


Muster Roll showing Rafe had deserted

Rafe returned to duty on December 13, 1862.  He was furloughed for 60 days from a hospital in Richmond, Virginia, on February 11, 1864. 


Muster Roll showing Rafe was sent to the Hospital in Raleigh

He was again sent to hospital in Raleigh prior to September 1, 1864.  Rafe survived the war and lived an additional 34 years.  He died in Granville County, North Carolina on December 31, 1889.  He was 47 years old.  Rafe is buried in the Ralph Currin Family Cemetery in Granville County, North Carolina.

Here's my relation to Rafe:

Ralph "Rafe" Currin (1842 - 1899)
is your 2nd cousin 5x removed
Ancil Currin (1813 - 1863)
Father of Ralph "Rafe"
Wyatt Currin (1794 - 1844)
Father of Ancil
Hugh Currin (1744 - 1823)
Father of Wyatt
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
Son of Hugh
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
Son of James
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Abner
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


Robert Marshall "Puss" Daniel was born in Granville County, North Carolina in January of 1837.  He was the younger brother of Thomas Brown Daniel and the older brother of Louis Chesley Daniel, both who served in the North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment.  He is my 3rd Great Grand Uncle.  Robert enlisted in Company G, North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment at the age of 24 on March 3, 1862.

1st Muster Roll for Robert


He was present and accounted for until he was captured at Kelly's Ford, Virginia on November 7, 1863.  Robert was confined to Point Lookout, Maryland on November 11, 1863.

POW roll showing Robert's exchange
 
He was paroled at Point Lookout, Maryland on February 13, 1865 and transferred to Cox's Wharf, James River, Virginia.  Robert lived an additional 44 years following the Civil War.  He died in Granville County, North Carolina on April 19, 1909.  He was 72 years old.  He is buried in the Mount Zion Church Cemetery in Berea, North Carolina. 


Grave of Robert Marshall Daniel

Here's my relation to Robert:

Robert Marshal Puss Daniel (1837 - 1909)
is your 3rd great grand uncle
L. Chesley Daniel (1806 - 1882)
Father of Robert Marshal Puss
William Henry "Buck" Daniel (1827 - 1896)
Son of L. Chesley
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of William Henry "Buck"
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce

James Henry Frazier was born in Granville County, North Carolina on December 27, 1840.  He is my 1st cousin 5x removed.  James enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment in Granville County, North Carolina on March 2, 1862.  He was 21 years old.


1st Muster Roll for James

 James was present and accounted for until being wounded at Sharpsburg, Maryland on September 17, 1862 during the Battle of Antietam.


Muster Roll showing James was wounded at Sharpsburg

He returned to duty in January of 1863.  James was present and accounted for until being wounded again, this time at Charles Town, West Virginia on August 21, 1864.


Muster Roll showing James was wounded on Aug. 21, 1864
 
He returned to duty on an unspecified date.  James surrendered at Appomattox Court House, Virginia on April 9, 1865.

Muster Roll showing James was paroled at Appomattox Court House

He would live an additional 26 years following the Civil War.  James Henry Frazier died on December 29, 1891.  He was 51 years old.  He is buried in the Philadelphia Baptist Church Cemetery in Nash County, North Carolina.


James Henry Frazier's grave

Here's my relation to James:

James Henry Frazier (1840 - 1891)
is your 1st cousin 5x removed
Elizabeth Currin (1815 - 1854)
Mother of James Henry
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
Father of Elizabeth
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
Son of James
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Abner
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Pomfret Blackwell Frazier was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1844.  He is my 1st cousin 5x removed.  Pomfret was named after my 5th Great Grandfather, Pomfret Blackwell.  Much like his cousin, Pomfret (Pumphrey) W. Adcock, Confederate records misspell the name Pomfret (Pumfred).   Pomfret enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment in Oxford, North Carolina on May 1, 1862 at the age of 17. 


1st Muster for Pomfret

Pomfret was wounded in the foot sometime in July of 1862.  He was admitted to Moore Hospital a/k/a General Hospital No. 24 in Richmond, Virginia on July 7, 1862.


Register showing Pomfret was admitted to Moore Hospital in July of 1862


Pomfret died from small pox in the Confederate Hospital at Staunton, Virginia on November 18, 1862 at the age of 18.


Register showing Pomfret's death

Confederate records indicate that a coffin was furnished in November of 1862.  Pomfret's burial location is not known at this time.   It's quite possible that Pomfret is buried in an unmarked grave in Richmond's Hollywood Cemetery, a common occurance for those who died in Virginia Hospitals during the war.


Ransom Purfoy Frazier was born in Granville County, North Carolina on May 19, 1840.   He is also my 1st cousin 5x removed.  Ransom was the older brother of Pomfret Blackwell Frazier.   He enlisted as a Private in Company G, North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment at Camp Crabtree in Oxford, North Carolina on September 7, 1861 at the age of 20.


1st Muster for Ransom


Ransom was admitted to C.S.A. General Military Hospital No. 4 in Wilmington, North Carolina with a fever on May 15, 1862.  He returned to duty on May 19th.


Register showing Ransom was in the hospital in May of 1862


In September of 1862, Ransom was again admitted to the hospital.  This time he was admitted to Winder Hospital No 1. on September 23, 1862.  The reason for his admission is not known.



Register showing Ransom's admission to Winder No. 1


Ransom returned to duty on September 30, 1862.


Register showing Ransom had returned to duty


Ransom was detailed as a teamster from January through October of 1864.   This is the last record in Ransom's Confederate Military Record.


Roll showing Ransom was detailed as a teamster

Ransom Purfory Frazier lived an additional 58 years following the end of the Civil War.  He returned home to Granville County, North Carolina where he died on May 1, 1923 at the age of 82.  His burial location is not known at this time.

Due to the fact that Ransom and Pomfret were brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart.

Here's my relation to Ransom:

Ransom Purfoy Frazier (1840 - 1923)
is your 1st cousin 5x removed
Mary Ann Blackwell (1815 - )
mother of Ransom Purfoy Frazier
Pomfret Blackwell (1769 - 1828)
father of Mary Ann Blackwell
Phoebe Blackwell (1812 - 1860)
daughter of Pomfret Blackwell
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Phoebe Blackwell
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce

James R. Hart  was born in Granville County, North Carolina on January 16, 1841.  He is my 3rd cousin 5x removed.  James enlisted in Company G, North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment at age 24 on September 7, 1861.

1st Muster Roll for James


He was mustered in as a Sergeant.  James was present and accounted for through April of 1862 when he was discharged for providing a substitute.  James would live an additional 41 years following the Civil War.  He died in Granville County, North Carolina on June 9, 1906.  He was 65 years old.  James is buried in the Hart Family Cemetery in Granville County, North Carolina.

Here's my relation to James:

James R. Hart (1841 - 1906)
is your 3rd cousin 5x removed
George Washington Hart (1808 - 1901)
Father of James R.
John Hart (1783 - 1844)
Father of George Washington
Jane Pomfret (1751 - 1823)
Mother of John
John Pomfret (1720 - 1814)
Father of Jane
Frances Hunt Pomfret (1747 - 1826)
Daughter of John
Pomfret Blackwell (1769 - 1828)
Son of Frances Hunt
Phoebe Blackwell (1812 - 1860)
Daughter of Pomfret
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
Daughter of Phoebe
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
Daughter of Martha Anne
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
Daughter of Phebe Lucy
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
Daughter of Valeria Lee
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
Daughter of Phebe Teresa
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce

4 comments:

  1. Hi, My name is Terry Ann Torres. My birth name is Terry Ann Currin. My parents met when my father, Stuart Ralph Currin, was stationed at Lackland AFB, TX. They had 3 children (1 son, 2 daughters) before they divorced and my mother remarried and her 2nd husband gave us his surname. I am related to you by blood, distant it may be. My grandfather was John Ralph Currin and his father's name was William Ralph Willie Currin and his father was my great-great grandfather was Ralph "Rafe" Currin. This is as far as I have gotten yet. I greatly appreciate this blog as I got to know a little something of my family. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad I could help you out. Ralph "Rafe" Currin was the son of Ancil Currin (1813-1863). Ancil was the son of Wyatt Currin (1794-1844). Wyatt was the son of Hugh Currin (1744-1823). Hugh was the son of James Currin (1720-1782). James was born in Norfolk, Virgina and was the first Currin to relocate to Granville County, North Carolina.

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  2. Chip,

    I have relatives who were in Companies D & H in the 30th NC Infantry. Charles M Rogers, his twin brother Martin V. Rogers in Company D, and James M. Rogers in Company H.

    Charles M Rogers was killed Sept 17th, 1862 Sharpsburg (Antietam)

    I'm a newbie to this research. Where did you find the muster rolls?

    Thanks,

    Eric

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I pulled all the military records from fold3.com. If you have an ancestry.com account, a fold3 membership is only $37/yr. They've got great Civil War era records.

      Chip

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