Sunday, February 24, 2013

The North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment: Fourteen Ancestors Serving in Four Different Companies


Regimental Flag of the 2nd North Carolina Volunteers


The North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment was originally designated as the 2nd North Carolina Volunteers.  Both Volunteer and State Regiments were being raised simultaneously to serve the Confederacy.  Early in the war, officials in the records department in the Confederate Capital of Richmond, Virginia were having difficulty keeping track of Regiments with similar numbers.  The State of North Carolina decided that all Volunteer Regiments would be redesignated as State Troops and that the Volunteer Regiments would now have to add 10 to their Regimental number.  The 2nd North Carolina Volunteers effectively became the North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment.

The 2nd North Carolina Volunteers were organized near Garysburg, North Carolina on May 15, 1861, however the ten Companies that made up the regiment had been training at the Old Fairgrounds in Raleigh since late April.  The men of the Regiment originally enlisted for a twelve month period.  Its men were recruited from the Counties of Warren, Granville, Catawba, Cleveland, Nash, Duplin, Halifax, and Robeson.  The Unit was officially mustered in to the service of the Confederacy on May 16, 1861.  The Regiment was officially redesignated as the North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment on November 14, 1861.  Soloman Williams of Nash County was elected as the Regiment's first Colonel.  Colonel Williams was a graduate of The United States Military Academy at West Point. 



Colonel Soloman Williams


On May 22, 1861, The North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment left their training camp at Garysburg by rail for Richmond.  Upon their arrival in Richmond, they were ordered to Norfolk, Virginia to help prepare for an expected attack.  While in Norfolk, the North Carolina 12th was placed under the command of Brigadier General William Mahone.

The North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment spent the Summer of 1861 at Camp Carolina, near the old Fairgrounds.  Camp Carolina offered ideal grounds to train and drill and the men of the 12th became proficient in the military art of warfare.  Military training aside, the men of the 12th lacked discipline.  Many men in its ranks were educated and wealthy and intermingled freely with the Field Staff and Company Officers.  This made it very difficult to discipline the troops.  As Winter arrived, the Regiment made its way to their Winter quarters at Camp Arrington, near the Sewell's Point Battery.   The Regiment remained at Camp Arrington until they left Norfolk on May 6, 1862.  The City of Norfolk was evacuated by the Confederacy just 3 days later on May 9th.  Following the evacuation of Norfiolk, Mahone's Brigade was sent to Petersburg, where the North Carolina 12th was detached from the Brigade and ordered to join General Lawrence O'Bryan Branch's Brigade at Gordonsville, Virginia.  



General Lawrence O'Bryan Branch


Lawrence O'Bryan Branch was born in Enfield, Halifax County, North Carolina in 1820.  His family relocated to Williamson County, Tennessee, however his mother died in 1825 and his father in 1827.  His uncle, Secretary of the Navy and Governor of North Carolina, John Branch assumed guardianship and took him back to North Carolina.  Branch moved to Washington D. C. with his uncle when John Branch was appointed Secretary of the Navy.  While in Washington, Branch was tutored by Salmon Chase.  Branch also studied at Bingham Military Academy in North Carolina before studying for a time at the University of North Carolina.  In 1838, he graduated first in his class from the University of Princeton.  Branch Moved to Florida in 1840 to practice law, just one year later he went to fight in the Seminole Wars.  In 1852, Branch and his family moved to Raleigh, North Carolina, where he continued his law practice and became president of the Raleigh & Gaston Railroad.  Branch was elected as a Democrat to serve in the 34th, 35th, and 36th Congresses, which served from March 4, 1855, to March 3, 1861.  On December 2, 1860, he was appointed, but declined, the position of Secretary of the Treasury by President James Buchanan.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Branch took the side of his native State.  In May of 1861, Branch enlisted as a Private in the Raleigh Rifles.  Later in the month, he accepted the office of State Quartermaster General, but resigned that commission to serve in the field.  In September of 1861, Branch was elected Colonel of the North Carolina 33rd Infantry Regiment.  He was appointed Brigadier General in January of 1862. 
After the Battle of New Bern, his Brigade was attached to A.P. Hill's Division, Stonewall Jackson's Corps. Lawrence O'Bryan Branch was the senior Brigadier General in Hill's Division.  Branch met his untimely death on September 17, 1862 at Sharpsburg, Maryland during the Battle of Antietam.  He is buried in Raleigh's City Cemetery.


Grave of General Lawrence O'Bryan Branch

After the North Carolina 12th joined their new command, Branch's Brigade was ordered to move his men to Ashland, Virginia.   There they performed picket duty, watching the right flank of the Federal Army in front of Richmond.   On May 27, 1862, Branch's Brigade was engaged at Peake's Crossing near the Hanover Court House.  During the battle, the North Carolina 12th was ordered to the Confederate left where they engaged in a sharp skirmish with the enemy.  Branch received word that the Federals were moving on his flanks. He ordered his men to disengage and return to Ashland.  During the battle, the Regiment suffered 7 men killed and 20 wounded.

When the North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment returned to Ashland, they were ordered to rejoin the Brigade commanded by General William Mahone in the Confederate lines at Richmond.  Colonel Soloman Williams was transferred to the North Carolina 2nd Cavalry.  Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Wade became Colonel of the Regiment.  On June 17, 1862, the Regiment was transferred from Mahone's Brigade and assigned to Brigadier General Samuel Garland's Brigade.  Garland's Brigade also included the 5th, 13th, 20th and 23rd North Carolina Infantry Regiments and was attached to Lieutenant General Daniel Harvey Hill's Division.


Brigadier General Samuel Garland

The Federal Army of the Potomac under the command of  General George B. McClellan had pushed to within a few miles of the Confederate Capital of Richmond.  Following the inconclusive Battle of Seven Pines, Robert E. Lee wanted to take initiative and attack the Federals rather than to remain on the strategic defensive.  Lee believed that a defensive strategy would play into Union hands and allow the Confederacy to be worn down.  The decision was made for a Confederate attack.  Lee planned to shift his 90,000 man army to the North of Richmond and attack McClellan's right flank. J. E. B. Stuart's Cavalry had ridden around McClellan's Army and confirmed their right flank was vulnerable on Totopotomoy Creek.  Stonewall Jackson's force was transported by rail from the Shenandoah Valley and was ordered to attack McClellan's right and rear.  The remainder of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, under the commands of Major Generals A. P. Hill, James Longstreet and D. H. Hill were to attack from the direction of Mechanicsville, Virginia. 

The Seven Days Battles began on June 25, 1862 with a Union attack at the Battle of Oak Grove.  The first major battle wouldn't be until the following day when Lee launched a large scale attack on McClellan's force at the Battle of Beaver Dam Creek.  There Lee deployed the Divisions of A. P. Hill and James Longstreet against Federal Major General Fitz John Porter's V Corps north of the Chickahominy.  Although the Battle of Beaver Dam Creek was a tactical Union Victory, McClellan realized that he could not keep Porter's Corps in place with Stonewall Jackson's force now threatening his flank.  McClellan made the fatal decision to change the army's base of supply from White House on the Pamunkey River to Harrison's Landing on the James River, effectively abandoning the railroad that led from the Pamunkey.   This move ensured he would no longer be able to supply his planned Siege of Richmond with the necessary heavy artillery. 

At 2:00 am on the morning of June 26, 1862, Garland's Brigade moved to the Chickahominy Bridge on the Mechanicsville Turnpike and joined Robert E. Lee.  The Brigade was ordered to cooperate with Stonewall Jackson on the Cold Harbor Road.


Photo of the Historic Cold Harbor Road taken in August of 2012


Stonewall Jackson's troops made up the Confederate left.  At daylight, General D. H. Hill found his route blocked and sent forth the Brigades of Generals Garland and George Burgwyn Anderson to the left to turn the Federals position.   The Union troops abandoned their defenses when the two Brigades began to move on their flank and rear.  General  D. H. Hill's Division moved toward Cold Harbor and was deployed along the edge of the Powhite Swamp.  The Divisions of James Longstreet and Ambrose Powell Hill were engaged with the enemy at Gaines' Mill.



Historical Marker at the site of Gains' Mill



Stonewall Jackson's and D. H. Hill's troops were ordered to support the Confederates already engaged.  Garland's Brigade was on the extreme left of Confederate line.  General George Burgwyn Anderson's Brigade was on the right of Garland's Brigade when they encountered the enemy at the edge of the swamp.  Garland's Brigade moved to attack.  After a short, bloody contest the Federals were cleared from the woods.  A general attack was then ordered and put pressure on the Federals front and right.  As night arrived, the skirmish ended and the Federals withdrew completely from their position.



Historical Marker at the site of Grapevine Bridge


The Confederate left commanded by Stonewall Jackson moved to cross the Chickahominy at Grapevine Bridge.  Unfortunately for the Confederates, Grapevine Bridge had been destroyed by the enemy during their retreat.  The troops went into camp as the bridge was being rebuilt on June 28th.  The following day on June 29th, the Confederates finally crossed the bridge and proceeded to White Oak Bridge, which had also been destroyed by the retreating Federals. 


Historical Marker at the site of White Oak Bridge

A large force of Federals kept the pursuing Confederates from rebuilding the bridge, effectively rendering Stonewall Jackson's troops useless while the Battle of Frayser's Farm raged on.  Following that battle, the bridge was rebuilt and Jackson's troops reunited with the right wing of the Confederate Army.  D. H. Hill's Division was moving to meet the enemy at Malvern Hill.  D. H. Hill's troops were placed in the Confederate center.  On July 1, 1862 a general assault was launched on the enemy's position at Malvern Hill. 

D. H. Hill's Division advanced across an open field.  Federal Artillery Batteries were at a distance of 700 - 800 yards.  Shot and shell tore into the ranks of the advancing Confederates.  Garland's Brigade advanced until they were forced to halt and take cover about half way to the Federal position.  It was obvious to Garland that support was not coming.  He ordered his Brigade to retire from the field.  Following the Battle of Malvern Hill, McClellan's Army retreated to Harrison's Landing.  The North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment suffered 51 killed, 160 wounded and 1 missing during the Battles of Gaines' Mill and Malvern Hill.


Battlefield Burials for Confederate Soldiers.  Following the Battle, the soldiers remains were relocated.


Garland's Brigade went into camp near Malvern Hill until they marched back to their original camp near Richmond on July 9 -10.  D. H. Hill's Division was then ordered to remain in front of Richmond to watch the Federal Army at Harrison's Landing. 

In mid August, Garland's Brigade was ordered to Hanover Junction.  On August 26, 1862 the Brigade marched to join the rest of D. H. Hill's Division at Orange Court House.  The entire Division moved to rejoin the Army of Northern Virginia on August 28th.   It reached the Army at Chantilly, Virginia on September 2, 1862 after the Second Battle of Manassas and crossed into Maryland on September 5th.  The Army of Northern Virginia halted when they reached Frederick, Maryland.  Lee sent Stonewall Jackson's troops to capture Harper's Ferry.  Longstreet's Division continued to advance toward Hagerstown, Maryland.

On September 10, 1862, D. H. Hill's Division moved out of Frederick as the Rear Guard of Longstreet's Column.  Hill's force was deployed along the South Mountain Gaps below Boonsboro, Maryland.  Hill stationed Garland's Brigade at Fox's Gap on September 13th.  On September 14th, Federal Major General Jesse L. Reno's IX Corps began to threaten the Confederate position at Fox's Gap.  The North Carolina 12th was sent forward to reinforce the North Carolina 5th, which was under heavy pressure from the enemy.  Unfortunately the Regiment was without Regimental Officers.  Their senior Captain failed to coordinate the advance of the Regiment.  The result was disastrous.  Men began to scatter as soon as they came under fire.  Some advanced to support the North Carolina 5th, some retreated from the field, while some others moved to the flank and joined other units for the remainder of the fight.  The commanding officer of the North Carolina 13th Infantry Regiment reported that "we were joined by a small party of the 12th North Carolina Regiment early in the morning, who continued with us throughout the day  and rendered us very efficient aid."

Federal Brigadier General Jacob D. Cox's Kanawha Division secured much of the land south of Fox's Gap.  Cox pushed through the North Carolinians positioned behind a stone wall at the Gap's crest, but he failed to capitalize on his gains as his men were exhausted, allowing Confederate reinforcements to deploy in the gap around the Daniel Wise farm.  Union soldiers reportedly buried 60 Confederates on Wise's farm, paying him $60 in compensation. 

During the engagement, Brigadier General Samuel Garland was mortally wounded while defending a stone wall bordering one of farmer Daniel Wise's fields.  He died within minutes.  Federal Major General Jesse L. Reno was also killed in the battle.  Colonel McRae of the 5th North Carolina assumed command of the Brigade.  In his official after battle report, D.H. Hill memorialized him, "This brilliant service, however, cost us the life of that pure, gallant, and accomplished Christian soldier, General Garland, who had no superiors and few equals in the service."

Garland's body was retrieved by Union troops and sent down the mountainside, where General George B. McClellan ordered an honor guard to accompany the body until it could be transferred to Garland's friends and transported home.  On September 19, 1862, Garland was buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery in his hometown of Lynchburg, Virginia next to his wife and infant son, who had both preceded him in death.



Grave of General Samuel Garland



Garland's Brigade, now under the command of Colonel Duncan K. McRae held their position until the following day when they were ordered to concentrate at Sharpsburg, Maryland.  The North Carolina 12th had entered the Battle of South Mountain with 92 effectives and suffered 58 casualties.

Just three days later, the North Carolina 12th participated in the bloody Battle of Antietam.  The reputation of the lack of discipline in the 12th had preceded the Unit.  Colonel MacRae was reputed as a man of commanding gifts, but of very strong prejudices, and the whole Brigade knew of his prejudice against the 12th Regiment.  The severity of discipline over bis own Regiment was universally known, and because the 12th was not willing to submit to the same discipline in camp as he enforced on his own men, he always spoke of the 12th as a lot of  "undisciplined gentlemen who thought themselves better than others."

On the morning of September 17th, the Confederate left was vigorously attacked.  Garland's Brigade, still under the command of Colonel McRae, and two other Brigades in Hill's Division Colquitt's and Ripley's) were ordered to support Stonewall Jackson's right.  Colonel McRae reported:

"The Brigade was moved from its position, on the Hagerstown road, to the support of Colquitt's, which was then about engaging [sic] the enemy on our left front.  This was about 10 o'clock.  We moved by the left flank, until we reached a point near the woods, when a line of battle was formed and the advance begun.  Some confusion ensued, from conflicting orders.  When the brigade crossed the fence, it was halted and formed and again advanced.  Coming in sight of the enemy, the firing was commenced steadily, and with good will, and from excellent position, but, unaccountably to me, an order was given to cease fire - that General Ripley's brigade was in front.  This produced great confusion, and in the midst of it a force of the enemy appearing on the right, it commenced to break, and a general panic ensued.  It was in vain that the field and most of the company officers exerted themselves to rally it.  The troops left the field in confusion, the field officers, company officers and myself bringing up the rear.  Subsequently several portions of the brigade, under Colonel Alfred Iverson, Captain T. M. Garrett, and others, were rallied and brought into action, rendering useful service."

The loss of Garland had demoralized the men of the 12th.  In an article in the May 1886 edition of a magazine entitled "The Century", D. H. Hill described the morale of the North Carolina 12th following their activity at the Battle of Antietam:

"Garland's Brigade was badly demoralized by his fall and by the rough handling it had received." ...." Garland's Brigade had behaved nobly until demoralized by the fall of its gallant leader and being outflanked by the Yankees."

Following the Battle of Antietam, Colonel Alfred Iverson was promoted to Brigadier General and was named Brigade Commander of Garland's Brigade on November 6, 1862.  


Brigadier General Alfred Iverson

By December of 1862, The Federal Army of the Potomac had positioned itself across the Rappahanock from Fredericksburg, Virginia.  On December 3, 1862, Hill's Division was sent to Port Royal, Virginia, below Fredericksburg and was ordered to prevent anyone from crossing the Rappahanock.  It remained there until December 13th when it was finally ordered to Fredericksburg.  As the Battle of Fredericksburg raged on, Iverson's Brigade remained in reserve, only losing 5 men to long range Artillery fire.  Following the battle, the Regiment went into winter quarters at Fredericksburg.  The North Carolina 12th spent the Winter of 1862-1863 performing picket duty along the Rappahanock River.  

In January of 1863, Lieutenant General Daniel Harvey Hill was ordered to Richmond to be reassigned.  His Division was reassigned to General Robert Emmett Rodes.   The Division remained in General Stonewall Jackson's Corps.  


General Robert E. Rodes

As winter gave way to spring, The Federal Army of the Potomac, now under the command of Major General Joseph "Fighting Joe" Hooker, made its way up the left bank of the Rappahanock River.  Robert E. Lee shifted a portion of his army to counter the threat.  On May 1, 1863, Stonewall Jackson's Corps marched down the Orange and Fredericksburg Road and headed toward the direction of Chancellorsville, Virginia.  

The Battle of Chancellorsville took place between April 30 - May 6, 1863.  It pitted Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia against Joseph Hooker's Federal Army of the Potomac.  Hooker's force was nearly double the size of Lee's.  Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson decided to split the Army of Northern Virginia and attack from two fronts.  


Stonewall Jackson


On May 2nd, Rode's Division, took part in a devastating flank attack against the Union XI Corps commanded by Major General Oliver Howard.  Howard had been warned of Confederate troop movements, however declined to prepare his men for an attack.  Stonewall Jackson's flanking maneuver targeted the right flank of the Union Army, which was unanchored by any geographical barrier such as a river or mountain.  The Union XI Corps were sitting ducks.  From the cover of the woods, Jackson and his command watched the unsuspecting Federals eating dinner in their camp.  At approximately 6:00 pm, the order to attack was given.   The Federals were completely caught by surprise.  Very few of the Brigades were able to meet the Confederate charge.  The XI Corps were completely routed.  The North Carolina 12th captured 3 Union Regimental colors and a Federal Colonel.  General Iverson was wounded in the groin by a spent shell.  The Confederate victory was one of Robert E. Lee's finest.  It came at quite a price. 


Battle of Chancellorsville by Kurz and Allison


As Jackson and his staff were returning to camp on May 2nd, they were mistaken for a Union cavalry force by the 18th North Carolina Infantry Regiment.  A soldier of the 18th shouted, "Halt, who goes there?", but fired before waiting for a reply. The men in Jackson's group screamed out for the Confederates to hold their fire.  Shots continued to ring out.  In all, Jackson was hit by three bullets, two in the left arm and one in the right hand.  Several other men in his staff were killed in addition to many horses.  Darkness and confusion prevented Jackson from getting immediate care.  He was dropped from his stretcher while being evacuated because of incoming artillery rounds. Because of his injuries, Jackson's left arm had to be amputated by Dr. Hunter McGuire.  Jackson was moved to the Chandler family plantation named Fairfield.  He was offered Chandler's home for recovery, but Jackson refused and suggested using Chandler's plantation office building instead.  He was thought to be out of harm's way; but unknown to the doctors, he already had classic symptoms of pneumonia, complaining of a sore chest.  This soreness was mistakenly thought to be the result of his rough handling in the battlefield evacuation.  Jackson died from pneumonia on May 10, 1863 at the age of 39.

His body was returned to his home of Lexington, Virginia, where it was buried in his family plot in the Lexington Cemetery, which was renamed Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery.  


Original Grave of Stonewall Jackson


A statue of Jackson was completed in 1891, at which time his remains were removed and buried underneath in the center of the cemetery.


Final Resting Place of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson



Stonewall Jackson's left arm that was amputated on May 2nd  was buried separately by Jackson's chaplain, at the J. Horace Lacy house, "Ellwood", in the Wilderness of Orange County, Virginia.





June of 1863 was relatively quiet for the men of the North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment.  By the end of the month, the Regiment took up the northward march into enemy territory once again.  On the 1st of July, the Regiment along with Iverson's Brigade, found themselves on the field of battle near the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  General Robert Rodes planned to carry out an attack on the north side of town, near Oak Hill with the Brigades of Iverson and Colonel Edward A. O'Neal.  Due to a miscommunication, O'Neal only sent forth three out of his four Regiments.  It was intended for the Brigades of Iverson and O'Neal to support each other.  Orders weren't clear on which Brigade should lead the attack.  O'Neal didn't commit his full force to battle.  Both of these facts were reasons that the attack failed, however neither Iverson nor O'Neal chose to lead their Brigades in person, but rather from some distance in the rear. 

As the piecemeal attack started to fall apart, O'Neals men began to fall back.   Iverson's force of roughly 1,350 men began to drift leftward towards a stone wall.   Little did the men of Iverson's Brigade know, but veteran Federal troops under the command of Brigadier General Henry Baxter lay in wait behind the stone wall.   As the men of Iverson's Brigade crested the hill, they were shot to pieces.  As many as 500 men were instantly gunned down.  Due to the way the line of battle was formed, the North Carolina 12th was not exposed to this onslaught.    Lieutenant Colonel Davis, who was commanding the North Carolina 12th at the time, ordered his men to take cover while he formulated a plan.   Davis ordered his men to make a surprise charge on the unsuspecting Federals.  This charge led to the entire collapse of the Federal position in the area of the battlefield in which the North Carolina 12th was engaged. 



Monument to Iverson's Brigade at Gettysburg


From the rear, it appeared to Iverson as though his men had laid down on the field.  Little did he realize, all those men were dead.  He exclaimed to Rodes that his men were "cowards".  Upon finally reaching the front of the battle, Iverson realized nearly his entire force was destroyed.  He was overwhelmed by the fate of his men and had what modern day doctors would call a nervous breakdown.  In total, Iverson's Brigade suffered approximately 900 killed or wounded on July 1, 1863.  Iverson was deemed "unfit for command" for the remainder of the battle.  The North Carolina 12th spent the remainder of the Gettysburg Campaign attached to Stephen Dodson Ramseur's Brigade.

Once the Army of Northern Virginia had retreated as far as Williamsport, Maryland, Robert E. Lee relieved Iverson of his command and assigned him to Provost Marshal duty, which effectively removed him from combat command.   The North Carolina 12th spent the Winter of 1863 - 1864 guarding the bridges over the North Anna and South Anna Rivers in Virginia. 

By May of 1864, Iverson's Brigade had a new commander, Brigadier General R. D. Johnston.  On May 9th, the men of the newly formed "Johnston's Brigade" were ordered on a reconnaissance mission to report the Federal position near the Wilderness in Orange County, Virginia.  During their mission, the Brigade became engaged with Federal Major General Ambrose Burnside's IX Corps.  The Brigade suffered heavy casualties during the engagement.  Johnston's Brigade was transferred from Rodes Division to the Division commanded by Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early, however on May 8th, Early had taken temporary command of the Third Corps.  Major General John Brown Gordon assumed command of Early's Division. 


John Brown Gordon


During the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, Johnston's Brigade was originally held in reserve near the "mule shoe".  The Brigade received orders from General Gordon to report to the front.  As the Brigade marched to the front, they encountered advancing Union troops and were pushed back, suffering heavy casualties.  Valiantly, the Brigade reformed and continued their attack.  First hand accounts from the men of the North Carolina 12th indicate roughly two thirds of the Regiment was killed or wounded in the battle. 

Following the battle, Early's Division was placed under the command of General Stephen Dodson Ramseur and participated in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864.  They also participated in the defense of Petersburg and Richmond.  At the Battle of Appomattox Court House, the North Carolina 12th made it's last charge against a line of dismounted Federal Cavalrymen, successfully carrying the position.  The remaining men of the North Carolina 12th surrendered with Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia on April 9, 1865.

Battle Flag of the North Carolina 12th, captured at the Battle of Cedar Creek, Oct. 19 1864 


Fourteen members of my family served in four different Companies in the North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment.

Company B was known as the "Townsville Guards" and was organized in Granville County, North Carolina on April 26, 1861.  The Company was ordered to Garysburg, North Carolina where it was mustered in as Captain Henry Eaton Coleman's Company. My three ancestors that served in Company B were all brothers from Granville County.

Charles F. Currin was born on April 17, 1846 in Granville County, North Carolina.  He is my 1st cousin 5x removed.  Charles enlisted as a Private in Alexander County, North Carolina on March 13, 1864, for the duration of the war.  He was 19 years old at the time of his enlistment. 


1st Muster for Charles


He was listed as present and accounted for until he was wounded in the left leg and captured at the Battle of Cedar Creek, Virginia on October 19, 1864. 


Muster Roll showing that Charles was captured on Oct. 10, 1864


He was hospitalized at Strasburg, Virginia before being transferred to a hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. 



Hospital Roll showing Charles' Injury and Transfer


He was then transferred to Point Lookout, Maryland on November 22, 1864. 



POW Roll for Charles



Charles was released from Point Lookout on June 26, 1865 after taking the Oath of Allegiance. 



Oath of Allegiance for Charles


Following the war, Charles returned to Granville County, North Carolina.  By 1910, Charles and his family had relocated to Durham County, North Carolina.  Charles F. Currin lived an additional 52 years following the end of the Civil War.  He died in Dakewood, Durham County, North Carolina on February 17, 1917.  He was 70 years old.  His burial location is not known at the time of this entry.



John Barker Currin was born on May 9, 1842 in Granville County, North Carolina.  He is also my 1st cousin 5x removed.  Prior to the war, John was a farmer by trade.  He enlisted as a Private in Granville County on April 26, 1861 at the age of 19. 


1st Muster for John


John was present and accounted for through December of 1864.  During the Gettysburg Campaign, John assisted the Ambulance Corps.  One can only imagine the horror he witnessed. 



Muster Roll showing John's service with the Ambulance Corps


Following the war, he returned home to Granville County and resumed farming.


John Barker Currin


By 1920, John had relocated to Redwood, Durham County, North Carolina.  John Barker Currin lived an additional 59 years following the end of the Civil War.  He died in Durham County on June 24, 1924 at the age of 82.  He is buried in the Stovall Baptist Church Cemetery in Stovall, Granville County, North Carolina.


Grave of John Barker Currin



Samuel Jefferson Currin was born in Granville County, North Carolina on May 31, 1838.  He is also my 1st cousin 5x removed.  Prior to the war, Samuel was also a farmer by trade.  He enlisted as a Private in Granville County on April 26, 1861 at the age of 24. 


1st Muster Roll for Samuel


Samuel was listed as present and accounted for until he was hospitalized in Richmond, Virginia on July 6, 1862 with a gunshot wound to the foot. 


Hospital Roll showing Samuel's injury


He was discharged in July of 1862 after furnishing Private William Dail as a substitute. 



Roll of Honor showing Samuel had furnished a substitute

Samuel lived an additional 53 years following the end of the Civil War.  He died in Stovall, Granville County, North Carolina on April 10, 1918 at the age of 79.  His burial location is not known at the time of this entry.

Due to the fact that all three of these men were brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart.

Here's my relation to Samuel Jefferson Currin:

Samuel Jefferson Currin (1838 - 1918)
is your 1st cousin 5x removed
Stephen Currin (1811 - 1882)
father of Samuel Jefferson Currin
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
father of Stephen Currin
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
son of James Currin III
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Abner Currin
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Fleming B. Currin was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1824.  He is my 4th Great Grand Uncle.  Fleming enlisted as a Private in Company B, North Carolina 12th Infantry at Taylorsville, North Carolina on March 13, 1864 at the age of 40. 


1st Muster Roll for Fleming

Sadly, Fleming would not spend much time with the Regiment.  Fleming was wounded during the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House on May 12, 1864 and died from his wounds on May 22, 1864. 


Register showing Fleming's death

Fleming Currin was 40 years old at the time of his death.   His burial location is not known at this time.

Here's my relation to Fleming:

Fleming B. Currin (1824 - 1864)
is your 4th great grand uncle
James Currin III (1785 - 1866)
father of Fleming B. Currin
Abner Currin (1810 - 1865)
son of James Currin III
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Abner Currin
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


2nd Company C was also known as the "Warren Rifles" and was organized in Warrenton, Warren County, North Carolina on May 2, 1861.  The Company was ordered to Garysburg, North Carolina where it was mustered in as Captain Thomas L. Jones's Light Infantry Company.  This Company was originally designated Company E, Company G, Company H and Company I, before it was it was finally designated as Company C.  Since it was the second Company to be designated Company C, it was officially referred to as 2nd Company C.


Samuel C. Harris was born in Warren County, North Carolina on June 2, 1838.  He is my 1st cousin 5x removed.  Prior to the war, Samuel was a farmer by trade.  Samuel enlisted as a Private in Company C, North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment on May 4, 1861 at the age of 23. 

1st Muster Roll for Samuel


Samuel was detailed as a Teamster in January of 1863, meaning he drove a team of horses for the Regiment.  Confederate records indicate Samuel held this position until being captured.


Muster Roll showing Samuel was detatailed as a Teamster


Samuel was captured at Strasburg, Virginia on October 19, 1864.


Muster Roll showing Samuel was captured

He was initially sent to Harpers Ferry, West Virginia  before being sent to Point Lookout Prison, Maryland on October 25, 1864. 


POW Roll for Samuel

Samuel was then sent to City Point, Virginia for a prisoner exchange on March 18, 1865.   No further record of Samuel can found in Confederate records.   Samuel C. Harris returned to North Carolina and settled in Granville County, North Carolina.  He died in Granville County on March 3, 1916 at the age of 77.  His burial location is not known at this time.

Here's my relation to Samuel:

Samuel C. Harris (1838 - 1916)
is your 1st cousin 5x removed
Reuben Harris (1797 - )
father of Samuel C. Harris
Ransom Harris Sr. (1764 - 1832)
father of Reuben Harris
Ann Washington Harris (1795 - 1870)
daughter of Ransom Harris Sr.
James C. Moss (1824 - 1891)
son of Ann Washington Harris
William Allen Moss (1859 - 1931)
son of James C. Moss
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of William Allen Moss
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Lemuel P. Hagood  was born in Warren County, North Carolina in 1825.  He is my 1st cousin 5x removed.  Lemuel enlisted as a Private in Company C, North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment on June 23, 1861 at the age of 36. 


1st Muster for Lemuel

Lemuel P. Hagood died from disease at Ridgeway, Warren County, North Carolina on June 24, 1862.  He was 37 years old at the time of his death. 


Roll of Honor showing Lemuel's Death


Lemuel was 37 years old at the time of his death.   His burial location is not known at this time. 

Here's my relation to Lemuel:

Lemuel P. Hagood (1825 - 1862)
is your 1st cousin 5x removed
Sabrina M Harris (1805 - 1845)
mother of Lemuel P. Hagood
Ransom Harris Sr. (1764 - 1832)
father of Sabrina M Harris
Ann Washington Harris (1795 - 1870)
daughter of Ransom Harris Sr.
James C. Moss (1824 - 1891)
son of Ann Washington Harris
William Allen Moss (1859 - 1931)
son of James C. Moss
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of William Allen Moss
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Elvis Green Adcock was born in Granville County in 1842.  He is my 2nd cousin 4x removed.  By 1860, Elvis had relocated to Warren County, North Carolina and was a farmer prior to his enlistment.  He enlisted as a Private in Warren County, North Carolina on May 4, 1861 at the age of 18. 


1st Muster Roll for Elvis


Elvis was listed as present and accounted for until he was wounded at the Battle of Gaines' Mill, Virginia on June 27, 1862.  He was sent to Warrenton to recover from his wounds. 


Regimental Return for Elvis following his injury at Gaines' Mills


He returned to duty prior to November 2, 1862, and was listed as present and accounted for until he was wounded in the hand at Chancellorsville, Virginia on May 5, 1863. 


Casualty Report showing Elvis was wounded in the hand at the Battle of Chancellorsville


Elvis returned to duty prior to July 1, 1863, just in time for the Gettysburg Campaign. 


Muster Roll showing Elvis had returned to duty in time for Gettysburg


He was listed as present and accounted for until he was wounded in the right lung and arm and captured at Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia on May 19, 1864.  Elvis Green Adcock died from his wounds in a Federal Hospital in Washington, D.C. on May 30, 1864. 


Muster Roll showing Elvis was killed following the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House


He was originally buried in the Confederate Section of Arlington National Cemetery.  


Original Interment Record for Elvis


In 1883, the Ladies Memorial Association had the remains of over 100 Confederate soldiers disinterred and brought back to the South.  The remains were placed in four coffins and were buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Raleigh on October 17, 1883.


Memorial Plaque at Raleigh's Oakwood Cemetery for the 107 Confederates who were relocated from Arlington

Close-up showing Elvis G. Adcock's name (3rd name on plaque)

Memorial Stone in Oakwood Cemetery for the relocated 107 Confederates


James E. D. Adcock was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1844.  He is also my 2nd cousin 4x removed.  By 1860 James was also living in Warren County, North Carolina and was a farmer by trade.  James enlisted in Warren County, North Carolina on May 4, 1861 at the age of 16.  


1st Muster Roll for James


James was listed as present and accounted for until he died in a Hospital in Richmond, Virginia on July 1, 1862 of disease.  


Roll of Honor showing James died of disease in Richmond


James E. D. Adcock is buried in Richmond's Hollywood Cemetery in an unmarked grave.  It's a goal of mine to make sure James gets the headstone that he most definitely deserves.

James and Elvis had another brother, Pumphrey Adcock, who died in the Civil War.  Pumphrey served in the North Carolina 15th Infantry Regiment and has been the feature of a previous entry.

Due to the fact that James and Elvis were brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart.

Here's my relation to Elvis:

lvis Green Adcock (1842 - 1864)
is your 2nd cousin 4x removed
Elvis Henderson Adcock (1810 - 1896)
father of Elvis Green Adcock
Jesse Adcock (1773 - 1860)
father of Elvis Henderson Adcock
Bollin Adcock (1737 - 1804)
father of Jesse Adcock
William Adcock (1790 - 1858)
son of Bollin Adcock
Annie Tyson "Fanny" Adcock (1835 - 1912)
daughter of William Adcock
William Allen Moss (1859 - 1931)
son of Annie Tyson "Fanny" Adcock
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of William Allen Moss
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


2nd Company D was also known as the "Granville Greys" and was raised in Oxford, Granville County, North Carolina on April 22, 1861.  The Company was ordered to Garysburg, North Carolina where it was mustered in as Captain George Wortham's Company.   The Company was originally designated as Company B before it was designated as Company D.  Since it was the 2nd Company to serve as Company D, it was officially referred to as 2nd Company D.

Fleming S. Beasley was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1842.  He is my 2nd cousin 6x removed.  Fleming was a clerk by trade prior to his enlistment.  He enlisted as a Private in Granville County, North Carolina in April 22, 1861 at the age of 20. 


1st Muster Roll for Fleming


Fleming was listed as present and accounted for until he was killed at the Battle of Malvern Hill, Virginia on July 1, 1862. 


Roll of Honor showing Fleming was killed on July 1, 1862


Here's my relation to Fleming:

Fleming Beasley (1842 - 1862)
is your 2nd cousin 6x removed
Fleming Beasley (1799 - 1861)
father of Fleming Beasley
Sarah Sally Pomfret (1763 - 1848)
mother of Fleming Beasley
John Pomfret (1720 - 1814)
father of Sarah Sally Pomfret
Frances Hunt Pomfret (1747 - 1826)
daughter of John Pomfret
Pomfret Blackwell (1769 - 1828)
son of Frances Hunt Pomfret
Phoebe Blackwell (1812 - 1860)
daughter of Pomfret Blackwell
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Phoebe Blackwell
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


George Bullock Daniel was born in Granville County, North Carolina on November 26, 1838.  He is my 3rd cousin 5x removed.  George was a farmer by trade prior to enlisting as a Private in Granville County, North Carolina on April 22, 1861 at the age of 25.  


1st Muster Roll for George


He was listed as present and accounted for until he was "discharged by promotion" on October 12, 1861. 


Muster Roll showing George's Discharge


George went on to serve as Captain of Company F, North Carolina 17th Infantry Regiment.  He lived an additional 47 years following the end of the Civil War.  George Bullock Daniel died in Granville County, North Carolina on August 21, 1912 at the age of 73.  He is buried in the family cemetery on his Great Grandfather's plantation, Tranquility, in Granville County, North Carolina.


Grave of George Bullock Daniel

Here's my relationship to George:

George Bullock Daniel (1838 - 1912)
is your 3rd cousin 5x removed
Nathaniel Chesley Daniel (1797 - 1853)
father of George Bullock Daniel
James Chesley Daniel (1762 - 1841)
father of Nathaniel Chesley Daniel
Chesley Daniel (1730 - 1814)
father of James Chesley Daniel
James Daniel (1707 - 1760)
father of Chesley Daniel
Josiah Daniel (1744 - 1811)
son of James Daniel
William Ford Daniel (1774 - 1848)
son of Josiah Daniel
L. Chesley Daniel (1806 - 1882)
son of William Ford Daniel
William Henry "Buck" Daniel (1827 - 1896)
son of L. Chesley Daniel
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of William Henry "Buck" Daniel
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



John Steven Meadows


John Steven Meadows was born in Granville County, North Carolina on February 25, 1840.  He is my 2nd cousin, 4x removed.  John enlisted as a Private in Company D, North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment in Norfolk, Virginia on August 1, 1861 at the age of 21.


1st Muster Roll for John

John was taken prisoner on September 14, 1862.


Muster Roll showing John was captured on September 14, 1862

Following his capture he was send to Fort Delaware, Maryland.  On October 2, 1862, John was sent to Aiken's Landing, Virginia for exchange.  He was officially exchanged on November 10, 1862.


POW roll showing John's exchange


John was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 1, 1863 and left in the hands of the enemy. 


Muster Roll showing John was wounded at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863 and left in the hands of the enemy


Following his capture, he was sent to DeCamp General Hospital, David's Island, New York Harbor where his wound resulted in the amputation of his arm.


List showing John was received at DeCamp General Hospital

Following the recovery of his arm amputation, John was formally paroled from DeCamp General Hospital and sent back home to Granville County, North Carolina.


POW Roll showing John's parole

John didn't let the lose of his arm slow him down one bit.  When he returned to Granville County, North Carolina, he became a Doctor and started a family.   John Steven Meadows lived an additional 36 years following the end of the Civil War.  He died in Louisburg, Franklin County, North Carolina on July 10, 1901 at the age of 61.  He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Louisburg, Franklin County, North Carolina.


Grave of John Steven Meadows



Loton P. Meadows was born in Granville County, North Carolina in 1842.  He is also my 2nd cousin, 4x removed.  Loton was the younger brother of John Steven Meadows.   Prior to the war, Loton was an artist by trade.   He enlisted as a Private in Company D, North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina on April 30, 1861 at the age of 19.


1st Muster for Loton


Loton was listed as present and accounted for through June of 1863.   He was wounded during the first day of fighting at Gettysburg. 


Muster Roll showing Loton was wounded on July 1, 1863


Initially it was reported that Loton had been killed in action on July 1, 1863.  Sadly, this may have been a more merciful way for Loton to have died. 


False Killed in Action Report for Loton


Following his injury, Loton was captured by Federal troops and sent to Fort McHenry, Maryland on July 6, 1863.   He was then transferred to Fort Delaware, Maryland on October 15, 1863.


POW Roll showing Loton's transfer to Fort Delaware


Loton was released from Fort Delaware sometime at the end of October of 1864.  He was exchanged on November 1, 1864.

POW Roll showing Loton was exchanged on Nov. 1, 1864

Sadly, Loton died on the way home after he was exchanged.   Deplorable conditions in the Yankee prison surely had some effect on his health and probably led to his untimely death.   Loton P. Meadows was only 22 years old at the time of his death.   His burial location is not known at this time.

Due to the fact that John and Loton were brothers, I'm only providing one relationship chart.

Here's my relation to Loton:

Loton P. Meadows (1842 - 1864)
is your 2nd cousin 4x removed
Rebecca Wheeler (1808 - 1862)
mother of Loton P. Meadows
Martin Wheeler (1775 - 1822)
father of Rebecca Wheeler
William Wheeler (1725 - 1780)
father of Martin Wheeler
Benjamin Wheeler (1755 - 1830)
son of William Wheeler
Benjamin Franklin Wheeler (1803 - 1883)
son of Benjamin Wheeler
Christopher Columbus Wheeler (1842 - 1912)
son of Benjamin Franklin Wheeler
Benjamin Elliott Wheeler (1883 - 1951)
son of Christopher Columbus Wheeler
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Benjamin Elliott Wheeler
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce


Wilkins Stovall was born in Granville County, North Carolina on June 23, 1836.  He is my 3rd cousin 5x removed.  Prior to the Civil War, he was a farmer by trade.  Wilkins enlisted as a Private in Company D, North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment on April 30, 1861 at the age of 25. 


1st Muster for Wilkins


Wilkins only spent a year serving in the North Carolina 12th Infantry Regiment.  He was promoted to 3rd Lieutenant on May 1, 1862 and transferred to Company K, North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment. 


Final Pay Voucher for Wilkins' service with the North Carolina 12th notating promotion


The biography of Wilkins Stovall will continue in the North Carolina 55th Infantry Regiment's entry. 

Here's my relation to Wilkins:

Wilkins Stovall (1836 - 1921)
is your 3rd cousin 5x removed
John Walker Stovall (1814 - 1899)
father of Wilkins Stovall
Wilkins Stovall (1785 - 1826)
father of John Walker Stovall
John Stovall (1736 - 1781)
father of Wilkins Stovall
John Bartholomew Stovall (1706 - 1781)
father of John Stovall
Josiah Stovall Sr. (1749 - 1798)
son of John Bartholomew Stovall
Rebecca Stovall (1772 - 1852)
daughter of Josiah Stovall Sr.
Phoebe Blackwell (1812 - 1860)
daughter of Rebecca Stovall
Martha Anne Currin (1834 - 1917)
daughter of Phoebe Blackwell
Phebe Lucy Daniel (1862 - 1946)
daughter of Martha Anne Currin
Valeria Lee Moss (1890 - 1968)
daughter of Phebe Lucy Daniel
Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis (1918 - 1977)
daughter of Valeria Lee Moss
Joyce Elaine Lewis (1948 - )
daughter of Phebe Teresa Wheeler Lewis
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Joyce



Company K was recruited from Warren and Franklin Counties and enlisted in February and March of 1862.  The Company tendered its service to the State of North Carolina and was mustered in as Captain Robert W. Alston's Company.  It was officially assigned to the Regiment in March of 1862.

Clarence Ruffin Broadwell was born in Wake County, North Carolina in 1823.  He is the husband of my 3rd cousin 5x removed, Nancy Ann Nowell.  Nancy Ann Nowell had three brothers who served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War.  They are Addison J., Jesse Robert, and Jeremiah James Nowell and have all been the focus of previous entries.  Ruffin enlisted in Wake County, North Carolina on February 4, 1863 at the age of 39. 


1st Muster Roll for Ruffin


He was listed as present and accounted for until he was captured near Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia on May 12, 1864. 



Muster Roll Showing Ruffin's Capture

Ruffin was confined at Point Lookout, Maryland until he was transferred to Elmira Prison, New York on August 10, 1864. 


POW Roll for Ruffin


Clarence Ruffin Broadwell died in Elmira Prison on November 10, 1864 from pneumonia. 


POW Roll showing Ruffin's Death


He is buried in Woodlawn National Cemetery in Chemung County, New York.   Ruffin was also featured in a previous entry regarding Elmira Prison.


Confederate Monument at Woodlawn National Cemetery

Here's my relation to Ruffin:

Clarence Ruffin Broadwell (1823 - 1864)
husband of 3rd cousin 5x removed
Nancy Ann Nowell Broadwell (1827 - 1873)
wife of Clarence Ruffin Broadwell
Willis W. Nowell (1806 - 1890)
father of Nancy Ann Nowell Broadwell
James Nowell (1767 - 1830)
father of Willis W. Nowell
John Nowell (1736 - 1793)
father of James Nowell
Martin Nowell (1682 - )
father of John Nowell
Dempsey Nowell Sr. (1728 - 1777)
son of Martin Nowell
Dempsey Nowell Jr. (1755 - 1810)
son of Dempsey Nowell Sr.
Rev. John Downing Nowell (1803 - 1859)
son of Dempsey Nowell Jr.
Joseph Warren Nowell (1829 - 1889)
son of Rev. John Downing Nowell
Walter Hinton Nowell (1855 - 1922)
son of Joseph Warren Nowell
Joseph Warren Nowell (1889 - 1954)
son of Walter Hinton Nowell
Ruth Adelaide Nowell Stokes (1918 - 2013)
daughter of Joseph Warren Nowell
Selby Edward "Stokey" Stokes Jr. (1946 - )
son of Ruth Adelaide Nowell Stokes
Chip Stokes
You are the son of Selby

1 comment:

  1. Hey man, searching my great, great, great grandfather John Barker Currin and found this. Awesome. I have actually been to his grave and seen the C.S.A marker.

    ReplyDelete